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Thread: 2007 R1200 RT Rear Brake question

  1. #1
    Registered User SilverRT's Avatar
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    Brake Question

    +1, I've felt no shutter with my rear brake after 3,000 miles. I agree, take it back and ask the dealer to fix it.
    R1200RT '07, F650CS '03 & Suzuki Bergman '03
    R1150RT 2004 & K75RT 1993 Sold

    "It's all about the journey, make the best of the road you find yourself on."

  2. #2
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    I've owned my 07 R1200RT for about 6 weeks now. I've noticed a slight vibration at the rear brake pedal every once in a while. It lasts for a second or two. I'm not too worried about it. The brakes are great.

    Johnv

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    A bozo on the bus deilenberger's Avatar
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    This sort of begs the question - aside from trail-braking - since you have linked brakes - why are you using the rear brake?

    I've found the linked brakes SO good that I basically ignore the rear brake except on hard low speed corners, and for hill-holding. The rear brake IS being applied by the link system since the dust accumulation on the rear wheel is actually greater than the front wheel..

    A bit of pulsing might be some pad deposits on the rotor that will wear off with some enthusiastic braking - but I'd expect to feel that as a shudder when you get to almost stopped speed.
    Don Eilenberger http://www.eilenberger.net
    Spring Lk Heights NJ NJ Shore BMW Riders New Sweden BMW Riders
    '07 R1200R (current ride) and some bimmers.. and a Porsche

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    >This sort of begs the question - aside from trail-braking - since you have linked >brakes - why are you using the rear brake?

    I continue to use the rear brake so I stay accustomed to using both brakes. Old habits die hard I guess. I just feel more comfortable stopping with my foot on the rear brake too. Who knows, my next bike may not have linked brakes.

    Johnv

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    Hmmm, might depend on who's braking on pavement, and who's braking on dirt.

    On pavement, with my '07 RT, no shudder. If I foolishly stab the rear brake descending down my driveway, the ABS actives, and it shudders....as it should. My drive is pretty much fine dust 'cause I've been running the cat up and down it to a "project," and all the gravel is gone.

    No ABS with only the rear brake on pavement.

    GAry

  6. #6
    Registered User maxfrankel's Avatar
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    rotor

    A shudder absent the ABS engaging is the telltale sign of a warped rotor. That's a warranty issue!

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnV View Post
    >This sort of begs the question - aside from trail-braking - since you have linked >brakes - why are you using the rear brake?

    I continue to use the rear brake so I stay accustomed to using both brakes. Old habits die hard I guess. I just feel more comfortable stopping with my foot on the rear brake too. Who knows, my next bike may not have linked brakes.
    Johnv
    You may wish to rethink this as deilenberger has a good point. Under most circumstances, you need more front braking force than rear - and the BMW system computes that when only the lever is used. I'd be very nervous about your technique in an emergency as you will not be utilizing the bike's full braking ability. In addition, use of the rear pedal along with (or instead of) the lever will promote unusually rapid rear pad wear.

    While some controls are standarized across makes, many aren't. GoldWing riders have to primarily use the pedal as that links one of the front discs with the rear and new BMW riders need to learn to use the lever. Remember the days when Harley's shift pattern was reversed from most other bikes and Kawasaki had neutral below first? And what about turn signal controls on your BMW?

    Tom

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    Quote Originally Posted by TomfromMD View Post
    You may wish to rethink this as deilenberger has a good point. Under most circumstances, you need more front braking force than rear - and the BMW system computes that when only the lever is used. I'd be very nervous about your technique in an emergency as you will not be utilizing the bike's full braking ability. In addition, use of the rear pedal along with (or instead of) the lever will promote unusually rapid rear pad wear.


    Tom
    Tom

    I'm not disagreeing with you or Don here. You may be correct. I have a question: If the brake system is set up to give maximum braking force with the lever, then wouldn't the lever override the brake pedal when both brakes are applied?

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnV View Post
    Tom

    I'm not disagreeing with you or Don here. You may be correct. I have a question: If the brake system is set up to give maximum braking force with the lever, then wouldn't the lever override the brake pedal when both brakes are applied?
    One would think so, John. But I read in another forum that using the rear brake pedal with the lever simply adds additional rear braking and therefore alters the computed F-R balance. Unfortunately, while the owner's manual seems to imply this, it's not at all clear. Hopefully, someone with more knowledge than I can give us the correct info, one way or another.

    Tom

  10. #10
    A bozo on the bus deilenberger's Avatar
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    I believe Tom is correct. I can certainly add more braking power by stomping on the rear brake when braking - you can feel it. But - IMHO - it's not optimal braking since that throws it out of balance - which is what the linked brake does so well.

    As Tom pointed out - you do have to learn how to ride specific bikes.. I once owned a brit bike and a Japanese one at the same time. Not only different shift patterns - but different sides for the brake/shift functions. That was dangerous.. so I try to learn the optimal way to use the controls on the bike I'm now riding.

    I grew up in the era when "everyone knew" you'd simply lock the front wheel and fall down if you braked hard with the front lever - so everyone overused the rear and underused the front. It took time to break myself of that bad habit - and I'm finally eliminating the final remnant of learned-reaction with the linked brakes.. I now only use the rear brake for slow speed turns or to hill-hold. In this case I'm happy to rely on a computer doing the balancing for me and know I can grab a bunch of front lever and get the best braking for the situation.
    Don Eilenberger http://www.eilenberger.net
    Spring Lk Heights NJ NJ Shore BMW Riders New Sweden BMW Riders
    '07 R1200R (current ride) and some bimmers.. and a Porsche

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    Quote Originally Posted by deilenberger View Post
    I grew up in the era when "everyone knew" you'd simply lock the front wheel and fall down if you braked hard with the front lever - so everyone overused the rear and underused the front.
    Don, when I bought my first GoldWing with linked brakes, I was told they had the pedal link the rear to one of the front discs because new riders were being advised not to brake hard with the front lever for another reason - it would cause a rear over front endo!!
    Tom

  12. #12
    karasek
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    I've noticed any 2007 with IABS2 will have a very slight pulsing in the rear brake under certain braking conditions not involving wheel lock up. It is normal and is most likely due to the integration feature.

    Try this. At a slower speed apply the front and rear brakes lightly. Then gradually increase the pressure on the rear brake while keeping the front brake consistent. You should feel a slight pulsing in the brake pedal.

    Most likely due to valves shutting and closing since you are now applying more pressure to the rear brake and the pump isn't needed for any integral build up of brake pressure.

    Your going to cause yourself and your dealer a lot of grief if you try and have this "fixed" as nothing is wrong.

  13. #13
    Registered User greenwald's Avatar
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    Cool Safe Braking

    With nearly 18,000 miles on my two-year-old R1200RT, I agree with previous postings: any rear-brake shuddering is abnormal, and should be addressed by a service visit, as it is a warranty issue.

    What I don't agree with is the plethora of braking advice once again rearing it's ugly head.

    As a Nationally Certified Motor Officer and MSF RiderCoach, the cavalier attitude and homespun advice being dispensed on 'proper braking' is neither encouraging nor safe.

    While automotive fatalities are actually DOWN 2% as of last year, we are in the NINTH year in a row that motorcycle fatalities are up. This does not speak well for how we are managing our risks as bikers.

    Aside from the 'alcohol factor' (and whose fault is that?!), we as a traffic demographic are either perishing in collisons we should have suspected, or are simply killing ourselves in curves sans any other vehicle involved.

    We practice poor riding techniques based on 'personal success' (aka 'luck'), tales handed down by Dad or Grandpa, habits we rationalize to death so we don't feel guilty doing it that way, etc. etc.

    The only proper braking is to use BOTH brakes every time you wish to slow or stop (dirt riding a different animal - apologies to all GS riders), and all four fingers on that front brake lever. It's also easier on the brake components and oftens results in consistent wear on both tires.

    While we're at it, we could also benefit from more head-checks than mirror checks, dumping our speed and setting up for an outside entry every time we approach a curve, and last but not least, ATGATT.

    ATGATT - All The Gear, All The Time! That translates into arms and legs completely covered, gloves, over-the-ankle footwear, a helmet, and eye protection above and beyond a windshield.

    You'll enjoy motorcycling more if you survive it.

    Ride ATGATT and Alert!

  14. #14
    A bozo on the bus deilenberger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenwald View Post
    The only proper braking is to use BOTH brakes every time you wish to slow or stop (dirt riding a different animal - apologies to all GS riders), and all four fingers on that front brake lever. It's also easier on the brake components and oftens results in consistent wear on both tires.
    I'll have to slightly disagree with you here.

    On a linked brake system - the system itself is capable of knowing what the weight transfer (which directly effects brake traction) is (much better than I possibly could) especially under emergency conditions and adjusts the front/rear braking force accordingly to provide the best possible brake traction.

    The BMW R1200R system is semi-linked. I'm not sure what your two year old RT has - it does have linked brakes and servo assisted brakes for sure, but it may be fully linked (either brake control activates both brakes) - I know the R1150RT was fully-linked.

    On the semi-linked system - the front brake does both, rear brake does rear only.

    It appears to be work extremely well and is effective at actually using both when only the front lever is applied since my rear wheel gets lots more brake dust than my front wheel does, and aside from using the rear brake a bit for trail-braking on sharp low speed corners - I rarely touch the rear brake pedal.

    The linked brake system DOES what you suggest - uses both brakes - in a manner to provide the most rapid deceleration possible. I don't think using the rear brake in addition to the linked brake action will provide repeatable shorter stops, and that's what I'm interested in - a controlled shortest distance possible stop - when I need it.

    BTW - I'm curious - what is a "Nationally Certified Motor Officer" and who does the certification?
    Don Eilenberger http://www.eilenberger.net
    Spring Lk Heights NJ NJ Shore BMW Riders New Sweden BMW Riders
    '07 R1200R (current ride) and some bimmers.. and a Porsche

  15. #15
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    the '05's have semi linked assisted WIZZY brakes...the rear does rear only!

    I ride several versions...ABS,Non-ABS, Disc,drum,linked, non linked...each one behaves diff and I always use both...old school/old habits. I know the RT will stop on a dime one fingering it...but my mind makes the right foot move EVERY time. And switching bikes and being in a one finger does it all mindset can be hazardous to ones health in my little world.
    Steve Henson
    SABMWRA MOA Club#62's Flat Fixer/ current forum moderator
    It's not the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away-D.Dillon/G. Strait

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