View Poll Results: Winterizing too often?

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  • Any chance to ride is a good thing, no worries

    19 86.36%
  • Just keep the bike away until March

    3 13.64%
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Thread: Winterizing too often?

  1. #16
    El Dookey loves to ride. 99007's Avatar
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    Or

    Maybe they didn't top off the tank which can help add moisture to the gas....
    Don't winterize; Rounderize!
    www.yearroundriders.com

  2. #17
    Blocking the slow lane
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    Originally posted by KBasa
    You're out there in the midwest where they seem to like to put ethanol in the fuel. I believe ethanol will destroy natural rubber lines.

    Do you think the problem may have come from an ethanol/rubber interaction?
    I've never had a problem with fuel lines dissolving from the midwest ethanol mix, but usually have to replace them after they start cracking externally.

    We've also never used fuel stabilizers. Just drain the airhead carbs, or park the EFI-equipped bikes. No worries.
    Jon Diaz
    BMW K75/K12GT
    BMWMOA Ambassador

  3. #18
    Subzero Scooter Idiot oldcarkook's Avatar
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    Fuel Chemistry ain't what it used to be...

    Fuel chemistry has changed dramatically in the last 10 years. Over 100 chemical compounds can be found in gasoline today including methyl tert-butyl ether, alcohols, etc. Many of the new fuel additives will evaporate more quickly than regular old "gasoline" and therefore your fuel chemistry will change in the tank as it sits. My experience with extended storage of fuel is that it will cause it to shellac. Stabil definitely prevents that in my experience with vintage vehicles.

    I'm a believer in fuel additives for specific applications such as cold starting, anti-gel, and extended storage. I don't think I could start any of my "no-spark engines" without additives for winter use.

    As far as Brad's direct question about can you winterize too many times, well yes and no. As long as you don't exceed the recommended limit of STABIL (or whatever additive you are putting in) for the given amount of fuel you have, you're ok. But you can over treat it.

    Here's what I do: I fill up and treat the fuel in the fuel tank, and then I keep a 5 gallon can of fuel that is also stabilized and then I top off my tank when I think that I am absolutely done for the winter. The head space (air) in the bike tank can allow for some condensation to form and that's how water gets in the fuel in extended periods where temperatures fluxuate from warm to cold. Topping off the tank eliminates the air space and potential for condensation, and I'm topping off with stabilized fuel.
    Experience is the comb that mother nature gives us when we are bald

  4. #19
    bearsfolks
    Guest

    Stabil and gasoline

    Gasoline does get gummy when it sits for long periods. This is in large part due to the additive package. Additionally, there are summer and winter blends of gas. The gas additive that causes the most problems is methanol, commonly called wood alcohol. This substance is an oily, smelly substance that will degrade certain rubber parts. Ethanol, grain alcohol, is harmless to rubber. Stabil has nothing in it that will harm rubber. I have been using it for years. On a bike with carburetors, the best insurance it will start after a winter layup is to drain the floatbowls, either manually or by running the engine til it quits. Fill the tank with fresh gas and a stabilizer and forget about it.

  5. #20
    El Dookey loves to ride. 99007's Avatar
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    The kook is the winnah!

    The idea of having treated gas sitting in a 5 gal can for fill ups after winter rides is the best.
    Kook, your prize is an extra heavy duty pair of socks for your 5 degree riding days! (Like you ever put your bike up for the winter)
    Don't winterize; Rounderize!
    www.yearroundriders.com

  6. #21
    What's that noise...? basketcase's Avatar
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    While we are on the subject ...

    Truth be told, (and depending somewhat on the locale) good winterization includes more than attention to the fuel.

    A good wash and fresh coat of wax can't hurt. Put the bike away clean, and moisture is deprived of a base to which to bond, thereby retarding most chemical action (deteroiation) on the metal, chrome, or other parts.

    In some places, it is necessary to seal off the ends of the exhaust pipes, lest insects, house meece, or sneaky woodland critters take up residence.

    The same applies to the air intake at the airbox. Upon taking his Harley out after winter storage several years back, one local friend discovered a dead mouse lodged under the tank -- when a mysterious odor wafted up to greet him at a stoplight. He went home and removed the baked mouse remains. But the residual odor still took a while to dissipate. Apparently, the mouse was fleeing the air box when he met his untimely end.

    For general purposes, putting the bike on the center stand on a level surface is better than leaving it on the side stand.

    Parked on the center stand, it is further helpful to air the tires to spec, and then slide a block of wood or styrofoam under the front tire to get it off the slab or dirt. Some old school techs used to recommend a rubdown of the tires with WD 40 at this point to stave off dry rot. By the time it hits the road again in the sping, the lube has lost its slickness.

    Finally, covering the bike with a breathable cover (i.e., one that does not retain humidity) to keep dust and crud from accumulating will do wonders for prolonging the finish.

    No claim for origionality here. I read most of it someplace that I just can't recall.
    '98 BMW Z3 Roadster, '00 R1100RT

    If you insist on exercising a right to burn our flag, first be so kind as to wrap yourself in it and then douse yourself with gasoline just before you strike the match.

  7. #22
    Registered User R100RS's Avatar
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    Last winter (my first in a cold climate), I filled up the tank and did nothing else and didn't ride the bike for a few months. When spring came around, I charged the battery and went riding. It was a little reluctant to start at first, and it stumbled every now and then with that first tank of gas.

    This year, I just kept riding. I ride at least a day or two per week, fill up when I need to. The battery stays charged and the bike runs great (once it gets warmed up, which is about the same time I pull into work).

    If I weren't going to ride it, I'd top off the fuel before puting it away. In the spring, I'd drain it and dump it in the cage and fill up with fresh gas.
    -Mike

    '02 R1150R
    '88 R100RS

  8. #23
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    Winterizing

    I have used stabil for years on various makes of bikes with no problem.
    Last year I used a marine product that was written up in Motorcycle Consumer News called 'Valvtect, an ethanol gasoline treatment' on an R1150RTP and had no problems.

    Peter
    2013 F800GT

  9. #24
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    I Likes ma Sta-bil!

    Me too. Winters here while cold are dry most of the time. So, I try to ride when I can.
    Stabil in the FULL tank of non-ethanol fuel works best for me. I also use Sea-Foam mixed with the gas a couple of times during the warmer climes to help keep things from getting gummy.

  10. #25
    Outlander Omega Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 164809 View Post
    I have used stabil for years on various makes of bikes with no problem.
    Last year I used a marine product that was written up in Motorcycle Consumer News called 'Valvtect, an ethanol gasoline treatment' on an R1150RTP and had no problems.

    Peter
    2013 F800GT
    Quote Originally Posted by james1300 View Post
    Me too. Winters here while cold are dry most of the time. So, I try to ride when I can.
    Stabil in the FULL tank of non-ethanol fuel works best for me. I also use Sea-Foam mixed with the gas a couple of times during the warmer climes to help keep things from getting gummy.
    WoW...you guys dug up an oldie. Good to see you lookin' 'round
    OM
    "Well they say.. time loves a hero but only time will tell.. If he's real, he's a legend from heaven If he ain't he was sent here from hell" Lowell George
    2009 F800GS 1994 TW200
    Part of the Forum Threadside Assistance Program

  11. #26
    Registered User RINTY's Avatar
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    Wonder if Brad or Gale (lorazepam) are still riding. Last posts were 8 years ago.
    Rinty

    "When you don't know where you're going, any road will get you there."

  12. #27
    Nickname: Droid
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    Oh, what the heck, I'll add to an old thread:

    Up here in east central Wisconsin the winters get pretty cold and dry. I usually ride from mid-March to the end of November. Put the bike away but at the ready for those odd few days in the winter when I can get it out and actually ride it. But, I never start it up during the winter "just to warm it up" and shut it down. That does NOTHING good for the engine. If I do start it up, its for an actual ride that gets it fully warmed and exercised.

    When I do put it away (going on 19 years with my 94 RS and 172k miles) I have never used Stabil. I always fill it full with non-ethanol gas. I also regularly use Chevron Techron at least twice a season. My 94 RS is still on the original (untouched) fuel injectors, fuel pump, fuel regulator with no problems. Idles smooth and is easy to balance the TB's using my cheapo mercury sticks. But I think another factor is to regularly ride the bike, and a ride is at least a 1/2 hour of constant highway speed, not just putting around town in 3rd gear.

    I have seen a bunch of BMW's in the shop with corroded/gummed up fuel systems because the bikes only get ridden 1500 miles a year if that much. So if the bike spends most of its time idle, not ridden, especially if ethanol blend fuels are your only choice, then I think Stabil is a good product to use.

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