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Thread: New Guy, Two Questions

  1. #1
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    New Guy, Two Questions

    I'm a new member awaiting delivery of a k75s within the next couple of weeks. My questions are:

    1. How important are specialized boot? I have good gortex, thinsulate boots (Rockies) are motorcycle specific boots really different?

    2. I wear glasses, so the new flip-up helmets look interesting. Anyone have experience with the Zeus ZS-508 or the new Jarow?

    TIA

  2. #2
    Slowpoke & Proud of It! BRADFORDBENN's Avatar
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    Welcome aboard

    Motorcycle boots are really different. It is not the weather protection it is the protection and material. I have a pair of Doc Marten$ that I purchased so I could wear them when I ride to work and not have to change my boots/carry shoes. After 7 days I had worn the seam away on the left top (shifter). Most motorcycle boots will either: a) not have a seam there or b) have reinforcement to prevent that. Also I have found a big difference in the shape of the sole and how they fit to the pegs. If you go to a dealer, they should let you try them on and then sit on a bike and see how it feels. Mine even let me try them on my RT.

    In terms of the helmet, I have glasses and a flip up Scheuberth. I wear my full face Arai most of the time cause it is quieter and worth the extra 20 seconds to put on the glasses afterward. Of course your mileage may vary. I do wear the Scheuberth on the short trips in town and it works great. From what I have seen most full faces are quieter than flip ups.

    Enjoy the ride.
    -=Brad

    It isn't what you ride, it is if you ride

  3. #3
    Focused kbasa's Avatar
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    Good motorcycle boots are made to stay on your feet, so look for boots that aren't just slip ons.

    Also, they should protect that little bone that sticks out of the side of your ankle.

    I've had a pair of Daytona Gore-Texs that are comfortable enough for walking, are waterproof and are built specifically for motorcycling.

    And welcome to BMW motorcycling!
    Dave Swider
    Marin County, CA

    Some bikes. Some with motors, some without.

  4. #4
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    I asked about the boots because I need them in wide widths. Most I have seen advertised seems to be in standard width only. So if specialized boots are recommended, what companies make in wide sizes?

  5. #5
    Slowpoke & Proud of It! BRADFORDBENN's Avatar
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    I have had good luck with the BMW Boots and have heard good things about Combat Touring Boots from Aerostich.
    -=Brad

    It isn't what you ride, it is if you ride

  6. #6
    Registered User 106427's Avatar
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    I've got triple E duck feet and I know that the Black Sheep boot company makes boots in wide sizes. If anyone else has any experience with this product I would like to know what you think of them. I've been lusting for a pair of these boots since the weather has started getting colder. ( Lusting over boots? Man I need to scale back this bike enthusiasm thing )

    James O

  7. #7
    GIZMO
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    Re: New Guy, Two Questions

    Originally posted by Rundel
    I'm a new member awaiting delivery of a k75s within the next couple of weeks. My questions are:

    1. How important are specialized boot? I have good gortex, thinsulate boots (Rockies) are motorcycle specific boots really different?

    2. I wear glasses, so the new flip-up helmets look interesting. Anyone have experience with the Zeus ZS-508 or the new Jarow?

    TIA
    Hi,

    According to the Motorcycle Safety Foundation, what you have in boots are sufficient. They preach boots or shoes preferably of leather that covers the ankle. The gortex is great for keeping your feet dry in the rain. There are many riders who wear and are very happy with non-motorcycle boots such as hiking or a good work boot. They will offer basic protection from road debris and will be better in a fall than sneakers.

    Having said that if you can afford it, I agree with the other responders in that motorcycle specific boots are really better for all the reasons given. In addition with some non-motorcycle boots I have found it somewhat difficult to get my toe under the shifter to shift because of a rather high profile, wear as motorcycle boots tend to have a lower profile in the toe area that facilitates easier purchase on the shifter. Another area of concern is the sole, you want a good traction sole that minimizes slipping when you have to put your feet down where it is not uncommon to encounter oil, gas or antifreeze spills.

    With respect to the flip-up helmets many folks love them, I have a Schuberth and over the past 3 years with it I have enjoyed the flip-up feature and the drop down sun shade but I hate the weight and the noise and am getting ready to go back to a standard full face.

  8. #8
    Gary99
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    Have heard the flip ups are noisey, I don't own one. A lot of standard boots would do, but MC specific are better. I have the Sidi Combat Tourers from Aerostitch and like them. They were comfortable from day one. They are wide from the instep forward, kind of a duck foot shape, and may be something that would fit you.

  9. #9
    Back in the Saddle mcmxcivrs's Avatar
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    There are some excellent motorcycle boots on the market, but there are also other good boots that will serve very well for motorcycling. I wear a pair of Kodiak boots when I ride. They are waterproof, are made of high quality leather, and are comfortable to walk in. I have been using this pair for several years, and they are still in good shape. There is no noticable wear from the shifter despite the lack of an extra pad. They are made of good grade of leatherand are insulated, so they provide good ankle support and protection. They are a full height lace up boot with a zipper kit laced in to make them easier to get on and off. The sole has a low heel that fits the foot pegs well, and has good tread to ensure good footing. I am not sure where you could buy these particular boots, since I get them free (kind of explains why I use them) as issue from work, but I'm sure that you would be able to find a comparable boot through retail sources. If you choose to not buy dedicated motorcycle boots, just keep in mind the purpose they are intended to serve.
    Ed Miller, Calgary, AB
    2008 K1200GT, 2009 F800GS
    I can't wait to retire and have a fixed income. The one I have now is always broke.

  10. #10
    ashby
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    I have both the Jarow and Zeus helmets. I like them both, though they are a little noisier than my full face. Jarow is nice because of the tinted internal visor, but Zeus is one-third the cost. For the price, probably the Zeus.

    Regards.

  11. #11
    GSer JERRY's Avatar
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    i've used different flip helmets in the last 20 years, including bmw and have always been satisfied.
    although true that full face helmets are quieter, i've never found one that allows me to put glasses on afterwards.
    perhaps i have a fat head.

    boots are for protection and comfort. the rest is personal choice. here's one for you to consider:

    http://www.newenough.com/oxtar_matri...boots_page.htm

    welcome and good luck,
    jerry

  12. #12
    Registered User crvalley's Avatar
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    Boots and stuff

    Rundel,

    I just purchased a pair of Cruiserworks Slip-On Tour Boots. They fit like a glove and the online ordering went very well...I highly recommend them if you have not already purchased a motorcycle specific boot.

    With respect to flip-up helmets, Shoei has just added a flip-up model to their line. I was considering it, but went with their regular full-face. The flip-up model did not fit as well as the regular full-face.

    Good luck,
    C R Valley
    San Mateo, CA
    '98 K1200RS
    In-Search of '69-'71 R75/5 fixer-upper

  13. #13
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    Helmets, you really need to talk to some helmet manufacture's professional sales reps at the next big bike show close to you. Getting the right style, half, three-quarters, full, flip up for the type of riding and the bike you ride is important. Then sizes vary, some helmets are designed for different shapped heads. Noise levels, ventilation, fogging, suspension systems, weight and comfort are important. This will help eliminate headaches, sore jaws, neck pains, hair loss, and the chin strap from trying to strangle you. The manufacturer wants you to be their best advertiser.

    Boots, I wear steel toe work boots. Road debris can hit the toe of your shoe at the same speed as you are traveling. Laces can get caught in some bikes shifters if they are loose. Wide boots on lowered pegs can drag in the curves.

    I really appreciate your concern for safety. JON

  14. #14
    What's that noise...? basketcase's Avatar
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    Boots, etc.

    First, I must confess to occasionally riding in jeans, a T-shirt, socks and street shoes. But I never ride without a helmet, gloves, and eyewear.

    That said, most of the time I wear my Roadcrafter, and mid-calf slip-on engineer boots. Anything that takes me out of town will see me depart and arrive in the fully protected mode. (I know -- the whole deal of not riding suited up in town is logically irrational ...)

    The boots were obtained about eight years ago at a local store for $75, and have been waterproofed several times over. They have not worn excessively at the shift-mark, mostly because all my motorcycles have had a rubber cover at the shifter (unlike the metal stud of the recent R models). I am sure that if on an R bike, the shifer would have long since done a number on the top of the left boot.

    Steel toes. As long as you can avoid an accident in which the steel in the toe is crushed, you are in great shape. A notable downside to steel toes is that if crushed by an impact so that they clamp down on your foot, the removal of the boot may add to the injury you already have. (The same applies to wedding bands or other rings worn under gloves). Another issue with steel toes is cold weather riding. It is harder to stay warm in them, in my experience.

    For my purposes, while the engineer boots are not flashy -- they nonetheless work for me. Additionally, if I take a mind to wear them to cut grass on the riding mower, I won't feel as if I am using the good silver serving spoon to clean the cat litter box.
    Last edited by basketcase; 12-08-2003 at 01:31 AM.
    '98 BMW Z3 Roadster, '00 R1100RT

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  15. #15
    looking for a coal mine knary's Avatar
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    ok.
    my 2 cents.

    What boots to wear is almost up there with helmet law discussions.

    Like Brad, I prefer motorcycle specific boots. They have, for me, worked better than other types of footwear - more comfortable, are reinforced in the right places, etc. They have also, IMHO, saved my ankles.

    Last April my bike and I tried to become with a deer. I wear an aging pair of the BMW Gortex boots. After tumbling down the road hard at 40+ mph, the boots were scuffed hard on each outside ankle. More than a few riders have, in similar circumstances, broken an ankle from the impact. Mine were fine. The armor, IMHO, did its job.

    Having said that, a solidly built pair of hiking boots will work fine. Many have ridden many many miles in them. But if you could find the money and can find a pair that fit well, I'd get the motorcycle boots.

    These Oxtar boots have been well reviewed and are a bargain. Do a search here for "oxtar" and a few threads will come up.

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