Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 27

Thread: Something Very Different

  1. #1
    Once there was a Tavern PAULBACH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Ballston Spa, NY; South of the Adirondacks, North of the Catskills and West of The Berkshires and Green Mountains
    Posts
    6,822

    Something Very Different

    Has anyone ever rode one of these? Front wheel drive! Found the picture of this bike for the Big GIG thread.

    Thanks Greg. I resized and renamed. That did it
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by PAULBACH; 01-06-2007 at 03:38 AM.

  2. #2
    Dances With Sheep GREGFEELER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Posts
    3,217
    Quote Originally Posted by PAULBACH View Post
    Has anyone ever rode one of these? Front wheel drive! Found the picture of this bike for the Big GIG thread. CAnnot upload same file twice so I have provided a link. Maybe the mod can work some magic.

    Click here.

    Just save the picture under a different name and you'll be able to upload it.
    Greg Feeler
    BMW MOA Director & Ambassador
    1972 R75/5, 1990 K75, 1990 K1, 1992 K75S, 2003 K1200RS

  3. #3
    OldAndBusted
    Guest
    that's awesome. radial? who needs transmissions anyway.

  4. #4
    Once there was a Tavern PAULBACH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Ballston Spa, NY; South of the Adirondacks, North of the Catskills and West of The Berkshires and Green Mountains
    Posts
    6,822

    Old ride!

    1920's technology! The engine appears to be inside the spokes.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by PAULBACH; 01-06-2007 at 12:01 PM.

  5. #5
    Still Wondering mika's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Fly Over Land
    Posts
    10,579
    Megola Motorcycles of Germany

    European Motorcycle Universe site

    Megola ÔÇô Wikipedia

    Here is one with a bladder for a gas tank.



    Pass the mustard and UP THE REVOLUTION!

    St. Paul Pioneer Press , Minneapolis Star Tribune

  6. #6
    RandallIsland
    Guest
    The first thing that comes to mind is how that might be such the trick for a hill climb.

  7. #7
    CTHalk
    Guest

    Fully faired

    I know a guy with a fully faired machine, a megola or similar. It is wild looking, Buck Rogers comes to mind. He says only a few were built streamlined. H.

  8. #8
    Once there was a Tavern PAULBACH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Ballston Spa, NY; South of the Adirondacks, North of the Catskills and West of The Berkshires and Green Mountains
    Posts
    6,822

    Follow the link

    M1KA provides a Wikepedia link. An interesting read. One very interesting sentence from Wikepedia:

    The crankshaft was the front axle, which remained stationary while the cylinders rotated with the wheel.


    Am I missing something? How does the axle remain stationary? Would not the axle have to rotate for the bike to go forward?

    Another link for this interesting design concept.

  9. #9
    Cannonball Rider #52 darrylri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Surf City, USA (Santa Cruz, CA)
    Posts
    4,536
    Quote Originally Posted by PAULBACH View Post
    M1KA provides a Wikepedia link. An interesting read. One very interesting sentence from Wikepedia:

    The crankshaft was the front axle, which remained stationary while the cylinders rotated with the wheel.


    Am I missing something? How does the axle remain stationary? Would not the axle have to rotate for the bike to go forward?

    Another link for this interesting design concept.
    Not at all. It was a common design for WWI aircraft. Planes like the Sopwith Camel and such had a radial engine with its crank bolted to the airframe and the crankcase bolted to the prop. The idea was that the spinning crankcase would get more air cooling. Also, most of the engine could be covered for better aerodynamics, and yet all of the cylinders would see some cooling.

    When the motor runs, something has to spin. It doesn't have to be the crankshaft...
    --Darryl Richman, forum liaison
    http://darryl.crafty-fox.com

  10. #10
    Once there was a Tavern PAULBACH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Ballston Spa, NY; South of the Adirondacks, North of the Catskills and West of The Berkshires and Green Mountains
    Posts
    6,822
    Thank you! Some very interesting engineering going on. I wonder if any other motorcycles featured front wheel drive?

  11. #11
    Cannonball Rider #52 darrylri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Surf City, USA (Santa Cruz, CA)
    Posts
    4,536
    I don't know of another front wheel drive like the Megola. But here's a Sachs rear wheel drive bike from the 1960s...

    --Darryl Richman, forum liaison
    http://darryl.crafty-fox.com

  12. #12
    Still Wondering mika's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Fly Over Land
    Posts
    10,579
    Here is a link to keveney.com and the explination of the Gnome engine, one version of a rotary engine. This may help you understand the concept a little better.

    Instead of the crankshaft spinning inside the cranckcase, the crankcase and everything else attached to it spins around the "crankshaft", or in the case of the Megola, around the stationary axel.
    Pass the mustard and UP THE REVOLUTION!

    St. Paul Pioneer Press , Minneapolis Star Tribune

  13. #13
    Focused kbasa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Marin By God County, California
    Posts
    11,639
    I saw that bike at the Art of the Motorcycle.

    It's pretty strange, that's for sure, but not the strangest bike I saw there. I think that award goes to the Bohmerlander (or however you spell it).
    Dave Swider
    Marin County, CA

    Some bikes. Some with motors, some without.

  14. #14
    advrider.com
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,192
    My head just exploded.


  15. #15
    BUBBAZANETTI
    Guest
    to answer paul's question;

    the Rokon Trail Blazer was actually a two wheel drive motorcycle, you could store fuel or water in the tires and when they were empty it would float:




    one thing i never understood about the megola or other machines with free spinning cylinders, how do the carbs or injectors get a steady supply of fuel, the only thing i could envision was a supply hose, that led directly to the crank that would fill a void in the spinning crank and allow the fuel to be fed up the cylinders and to the carbs using centrifugal force. any radial mechanics in the house??? i'm pretty sure the spinning engine was a rarity in the aviation world and wasn't commonly used after WWI

    edit: upon blowing up the picture above it would seem the carb is actually located in the hub. man those little straight pipes must have been LOUD

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •