Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 89

Thread: Digital cameras

  1. #61
    Once there was a Tavern PAULBACH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Ballston Spa, NY; South of the Adirondacks, North of the Catskills and West of The Berkshires and Green Mountains
    Posts
    6,822

    Another late entry

    From MIKA's post this morning:



    SUPER PHYSIQUE

    At 1.4 pounds and 5.1 ?ù 3.6 ?ù 2.8 inches, the K100D is one of the lightest, smallest digital SLRs. Despite its diminutive dimensions, it makes room for a comfortable handgrip, large control buttons and knobs, and a generous 2.5-inch LCD screen.

    STRAIGHT SHOOTING

    Got jittery hands? Gyroscopic sensors detect camera shake and send signals to magnets inside the K100D. The magnets stabilize the free-floating image sensor plate to counteract your motion, keeping the CCD still while the camera body moves around it.

    PRISTINE PIXELS
    A custom image processor effectively eliminates most pixel noise ÔÇô those fuzzy-looking artifacts caused by amplifying weak light signals. But the chip is slower than others at processing photos and getting the camera ready for its next shot.

    LUXURIOUS LENS
    Many SLRs come with a low-end lens to get you started, but the PentaxÔÇÖs included 18- to 55-mm lens captures razor-sharp pics with minimal geometric distortion, the common bending of straight lines at wide-angle settings.

    COMMON CARDS, CELLS
    Just like your entry-level pocket cam, the K100D accepts SD cards. (But they arenÔÇÖt included.) The K100D also takes a lithium-ion battery or four AAs, so you can substitute disposables when your planet- and money-saving rechargeables run dry.

    $700

    www.pentaximaging.com
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  2. #62
    TOR1150R
    Guest
    While touring Canada this past summer we took a Canon AF540 digital camera. Far from high tech, and not an SLR, but it served us quite well. Most of our pictures were taken while riding, and if we did drop or loose the camera the reaonable price of $300 CAD wasn't too hard to swallow.

  3. #63
    Airhead GS convert...
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    NW Ohio
    Posts
    336
    Tom Moran's post #57 summed it up so well, I've nothing to add in that digital direction. But for my own travel photo gear I march to a different drummer. Probably not for everybody, but it can be done....

    Right now, film gear is really cheap (used). And I've ended up with a collection of about a dozen 35mm and medium-format units. Rolleiflexes, a Widelux with a panoramic (swinging) lens, a weather-resistant 35mm Olympus Stylus.

    Generally, I'll have at least 3 cameras. The 35mm p&s weather-resist Olympus absolutely goes, in a little fanny pack, outside my 'Stich. Always handy, and able to hand it to strangers so they can take decent photos of me and my partner Sharon. Lens is decent, but not great. Best not to use the zoom. But the camera is cheap and robust, has a flash, and an idiot can use it. It takes an odd battery, a 123 model, so I buy an extra ahead of time and put it in the same padded fanny-pack.

    Next, I'll pack the same big Lowepro camera bag that Kbasa posted on waaaaaay back, and it goes in my tankbag. Seems the smoothest best-protected spot on the bike. Then my favorite gear for moto trips (assuming the trip is not all dirt roads) is my 1950s-era Rolleiflex or Rolleicord, a medium-format twin-lens camera where I view the scene on a non-electric 2" square viewscreen on top the camera. I can compose and shoot w/o removing my helmet using that camera, there's no batteries to die, and when the big negatives are scanned they produce Jpeg images in the 20 mega-pixel range. I also have some macro lenses that are very compact that I'll toss in, too. So now I'm covered for tiny shots and normal-view shots.

    Next the Widelux panoramic camera, which just takes 35mm film, for the "big picture." Excellent in big sky country, small towns (one shot shows the whole town), and many other places where you're up close but want to capture a wide area. Those negs easily produce 10 mega-pixel images if desired.

    Then add film and a cheap light-meter (since only the modern Olympus has a built-in meter), and a couple extra batteries for the meter (SR-44, about the size of under-bucket valve adjust shims). They last a long time, and odds are I won't need a new one, but if I do, I'm ready.

    With the above setup, I'm unlikely to ever lose all 3 cameras due to accident / theft / old age. If all the batteries did die, two of the three cameras are still fully functional by using a light-meter spreadsheet on my PDA, or by my own memory of how much light requires what exposure. In daylight, I generally don't use a meter, as I don't need it. But in trickier lighting (long exposures indoors, for instance, such as in a mine or a bar), I'll use the meter. The only camera I'd be really busted up about losing is the Widelux, a good one is sorta pricey for a 50 y/o camera (a grand or so). The other two cameras aren't really worth much at all.

    Oh, I also take a tripod. Size depends on how much room I can spare.

    Back home, I'll have the negs scanned when processed, and go from there.

    I like the robust, proven nature of the group above. They seem quite resistant to vibration on the GS, or my DR-350, or even in my Jeep. I like the redundancy, ie, neither battery failure nor even 1-2 camera failures would cripple my ability to come home with good stuff.

    I'm actually looking at a 50 y/o 4x5 press camera and a Polaroid back, as well as conventional 4x5 sheet film, for the times when I really want detail. I figure with a Polaroid back on the press camera, I might even enter some long-distance rallies. Depending on the model, several of them have a wire-frame view finder, and I could shoot w/o taking off my helmet.

    My 12 y/o son shoots digital on trips, a little 6 mega-pixel Nikon P&S, as well. Pocketable, gives decent results with no experience at all. But shutter lag is a pain if you've grown used to not having shutter lag.

  4. #64
    Original 1973 LWB R75/5 TheSlashFiveTourer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    371
    Bought one of these 'GORILLAPOD' tripods at a local store in July for $25.00 (CDN). Clings to tree limbs, fence rails, handlebars, foot-long hotdogs and garbage pail covers. Amazing little critter! Should be one in every photo bag.
    Don't leave home without the little feller.

    A GorillaPod news blurb.

    And GorillaPod themselves.
    `
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    ~ ~ ~ /5 Express
    Have Train? - Will Travel!

  5. #65
    Unfunded content provider tommcgee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Braintree, MA
    Posts
    3,087
    http://www.imaging-resource.com has excellent in-depth reviews and plenty of other useful info to help you decide what to get.

    http://www.kenrockwell.com/index.htm has terrific practical info about taking pictures.

    I just picked up a Canon SD900 after a long line of Sony digital cameras and it's very impressive so far, but I'm not yet up to speed on the menu system. That will take a awhile, but the automatic settings have given me most of what I want.

  6. #66
    aprarye
    Guest
    camera doesn't matter digi, film, DSLR, or P&S... I used to carry a Pentax 6x7 cm or a Fuji X-Pan (24x65mm) but nothing now I'm looking for a new one.

    This is a good secure set up Just don't leave it up for a long time Vibration will loosen it as you go. The Flex Arm will absorb some vibrations unlike a rigid mount

    Bogen / Manfrotto 2896HD Heavy-Duty Flex Arm - for Super Clamp
    This is a type of flexable goose neck that will mount in the super clamp
    and a Bogen / Manfrotto 2915 Super Clamp without Stud. The super clamp will fit on frame or handlebars
    see it at:
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...goryNavigation

    for a different angel use a monopod to put the camera out to the side of you. Mount the camera to the monopod than sit on the monopod so the camera sticks out to the side of the bike.

    An electronic remote release can be taped to the handlebars, jacket or hung around your neck till needed . These will breakaway I.C.E.

  7. #67
    aprarye
    Guest
    for some different views look at http://www.panoramicimages.com and search using two words ... motorcycle motion

  8. #68
    Unfunded content provider tommcgee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Braintree, MA
    Posts
    3,087
    Quote Originally Posted by aprarye
    for some different views look at http://www.panoramicimages.com and search using two words ... motorcycle motion
    I can do panorama on my new Canon SD900. Looking forward to an image worth recording!

  9. #69
    Unfunded content provider tommcgee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Braintree, MA
    Posts
    3,087
    Quote Originally Posted by aprarye
    camera doesn't matter digi, film, DSLR, or P&S... I used to carry a Pentax 6x7 cm or a Fuji X-Pan (24x65mm) but nothing now I'm looking for a new one.

    This is a good secure set up Just don't leave it up for a long time Vibration will loosen it as you go. The Flex Arm will absorb some vibrations unlike a rigid mount

    Bogen / Manfrotto 2896HD Heavy-Duty Flex Arm - for Super Clamp
    This is a type of flexable goose neck that will mount in the super clamp
    You're essentially right about the camera not mattering, though if your composition skills are good, some cameras make it a whole lot faster and easier to get what you see. I gave two of my dotters Canon A540's for Christmas and I'm blown away how easy it is to get really great shots from a $150 camera.

    And THANK YOU! THANK YOU! THANK YOU! for the link on that flex arm. I've been looking for something like that for a couple of months!

  10. #70
    RK Ryder
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    London, Ontario
    Posts
    2,044

    Scanner

    Quote Originally Posted by DougGrosjean
    I can compose and shoot w/o removing my helmet using that camera, there's no batteries to die, and when the big negatives are scanned they produce Jpeg images in the 20 mega-pixel range.
    This year I got rid of all of my Hasselblads, but I am interested in scanning past negatives. What scanner do you use to scan the Rollei's negs?

    Thanks in advance, Doug.

    Paul F.
    Paul
    Retired and riding my RTs, the '87 K100 & the '98 R1100 !
    Treasurer of the Forest City Motorrad Club #159
    Knights of the Roundel #333

  11. #71
    Seattle-area Rounder OfficerImpersonator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Just north of Seattle, WA
    Posts
    2,806
    Here's my $.02 cents worth on what is already an exhaustively posted topic.

    I have two cameras - both a few years old. The Canon D60 DSLR is the big bad daddy. Include the three lenses, cleaning equipment, extra batteries, filters, remote shutters, tripod mounting plates, etc. and it's a big load to schlep around. I have a Pelican/Lowepro combo (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...o-20/ref=nosim) that fits in one of my side cases. The waterproof/bulletproof (okay - no emprical evidence to support the bulletproof claim) case has been down the Grand Canyon in a boat twice (288 miles down the Colorado length-wise, not width-wise) and on many a kayak expedition. It keeps EVERYTHING out of your camera - as long as you keep the lid closed

    Not so great for taking photos while on the bike, but a great way to protect the camera while in route to your destination.

    My other camera is an older Canon PowerShot S400. The cool thing about the tiny Canon digital point and shoot cameras is that you can almost always get a waterproof housing for them. (http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/co...derwater_photo) While the housings are generally for underwater photography, it also makes the camera great for simply hanging around your neck, even if you get stuck in a rain storm. These waterproof housings ain't cheap, and you need to get a new housing if you upgrade the camera, but for me the photos are priceless, so I'll spare no expense when it comes to safely getting the camera and the exposed "film" back home.

    My suggestion for a friendly case for a point and shoot are the small electronics cases sold by REI. (http://www.rei.com/online/store/Prod...cat=REI_SEARCH)
    These little pouches have velcro straps that will attach to just about anything - the velcro strips on your Roadcrafter, around your mirror stem, to your tank bag - whatever - and your camera is always right there, somewhat protected from a brief shower or getting bumped. And you can't beat the price!
    Seattle, WA
    2012 R1200GSA
    2002 R1150RT-P
    1992 K75S sold

  12. #72
    Airhead GS convert...
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    NW Ohio
    Posts
    336
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul_F
    This year I got rid of all of my Hasselblads, but I am interested in scanning past negatives. What scanner do you use to scan the Rollei's negs?

    Thanks in advance, Doug.

    Paul F.
    Hi Paul,

    I don't pop in here every day, so that's why the delay.

    I use a Epson Perception 2400, IIRC. It's got a backlight in the lid for lighting the negs, but didn't have a fixture for 120 film. So there's a guy out of Atlanta (Doug Fisher or Doug Mason) who makes a 120 filmholder.

    But point is moot, because it's about 4 years old now, and there's better stuff out there now. But I tend to buy and keep stuff a long time, so I don't have any reccomendations on current gear.

    However, a search of www.photo.net archives would point you in the right direction for 120 negative scanning.

    HTH!

    Doug Grosjean

    PS:
    Pano cameras rock, even if film. Fun to do in 1/250 second what it'll take a digital user a bit of time back at the terminal.... Hey, I've got to enjoy the few moments of superiority I get anymore.....

  13. #73
    Seattle-area Rounder OfficerImpersonator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Just north of Seattle, WA
    Posts
    2,806
    If you ever want way TOO much information on any digital camera ever made, check out http://www.dpreview.com for digital camera reviews, photography tips, latest prices, etc. Again, the site has way too much information for my amateur photographer needs, but too much information is always better than too little information, unless of course you're talking about your parent's sex lives!
    Seattle, WA
    2012 R1200GSA
    2002 R1150RT-P
    1992 K75S sold

  14. #74
    aprarye
    Guest
    By the way the images at & on http://www.panoramicimages.com were shot using FILM. Film formats vary but never cropped from a 35mm (24x36mm). 90% were with were shot with 6x17cm (2.25x 5.75") film most of the rest range from 24x65mm to 4x10" film.

    scanning your film... best scanner is a drum type scanner. But that is a totally pro piece of eqiupement. Spend as much as you can and get a wet mounting adapter. Take a look at http://scanscience.com. Other than that a film scanner for film Nikon has two 35 mm scanners both which
    produce outstanding results, same performace but different kinks and
    add ons. You can do fluid scanning on the Nikon very economically,
    and with a more technically advanced implementation that avoids
    'flatbedding'.
    A flatbed for doccuments and flat art.

    The epson V750 is a nice flatbed that will also do film as most flatbeds. But when doing film wet mouting will get you the best performance.

    one other tip just shoot it and as large as you can (digi file) and edit later

  15. #75
    aka Papa Yams jyambrovich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Scotts Valley, CA
    Posts
    156

    Humble camera but good results

    I've got a small Nikon Coolpix 2100 (yes, 2.1MP resolution) that I bought 3 years ago. It fits in most shirt pockets and fits nicely in my tank bag. I've got a small case that attaches to the belt on my jacket so it can be carried there too.

    I've taken some photos with it while riding (see attached for an example) that I reduced in resolution in order to post here. It can be a lot of fun but I will only do it out on an open road with no traffic around.

    The mirror shot is my favorite. It's of a buddy on a Yamaha cruiser-style bike and he's where he belongs (BEHIND my BMW) on the ride. You can see the small size of the camera in the mirror. My hands are small for a guy and the camera fits nicely.

    JAY YAMBROVICH
    2000 R1100RT Opal Blue, 35820 miles
    Attached Images Attached Images  

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •