Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 35

Thread: First-Aid Kits

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Plasterman tgf429's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Tiffin, Iowa
    Posts
    148

    First-Aid Kits

    How many people carry a first-aid kit on their bikes. Is it better to buy one or make one up yourself? Where did you purchase yours?

    Thanks

    Tom

  2. #2
    Hogaan! testinglogin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Toledo, OH
    Posts
    4,745
    I purchased one at Dicks Sporting Goods, right before I went to the MOA rally. I figured there was space for one originally on my bike, so I might as well put one there. I didn't actually need to use it, but I'm sure I would have appreciated it, if I had. I was in some pretty remote areas on my ride out, and it would have been hard to get a band-aid, I think.
    Josh Metzger - Toledo, OH
    BMWMOA#123695, ABC#8463
    1978 R80/7, 1993 R100GSPD

  3. #3
    Registered User kurt1305's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    237
    Most are pretty general and have a lot of things you don't need while lacking in basics for motorcycle specific emergencies. I made up my own:


  4. #4
    Custom User Title USERNAME's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    3,464
    i carry one from aerostich. linky

  5. #5
    Novice Adventurer Newstar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Landenberg, PA
    Posts
    2,690
    I have a small first aid kit that fits neatly in the tail compartment of my 650GS. It was one of those freebie give-a-ways during open enrollment for healthcare benefits. It holds all the basics but hopefully I will never need to use it.

  6. #6
    Registered User RGVILLA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Rural Valley, PA
    Posts
    586
    I carry the one I made up, has bandaids, sterile pads, gauze, tape, scissors, ace bandage, material for a tourniquet, amonia inhalants, sterile wipes, ibuprofin, tylenol, pain killer, arm sling, rubber gloves, snake bite kit. If you haven't done so I recommend you take the red cross course on basic first aid and CPR. you know, stop the bleeding, clear the airway, CPR as needed, treat for shock etc. EMS are usually not far away when called for but if someone is not breathing or has arterial bleeding you might just be able to save them prior to EMS arriving.
    Richard Villa
    2007 Aprilia Caponord, 97 DR350/441, looking for an airhead, sold the R1100R
    "Rebels of the South, It is better to die on your feet than to continue living on your knees" Emiliano Zapata

  7. #7
    AZ Peckerhead Jamming's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Buckeye AZ
    Posts
    176
    Kurt, If I ever need first aid, you got the kit. Nice!
    I bought a starter kit from a military surplus store, I've added a couple of things to it, gloves, band-aids, shield for mouth to mouth. Needles and monofilment.
    I was a Para-rescue troop in the Military so I'm trained in advanced aid, been a few years, but I still remember.
    My kit lives in a pouch in the right bag, used it a few times on myself and others.

    Rog

  8. #8
    unregistered user HODAG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    3,445
    I got a small one

  9. #9
    Fl Keys Fishing Guide RIDERR1150GSADV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    2,404

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by marK11LT
    I got a small one
    We all feel your pain.


    On a seriuos note, I carry a fairly big kit from West Marine and added extra burn packs to it as that is relevant to us riders. I hope never to have to use it other than a band aid but it is there if needed.

  10. #10
    Registered User kurt1305's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    237
    Quote Originally Posted by Jamming
    Kurt, If I ever need first aid, you got the kit. Nice!
    I bought a starter kit from a military surplus store, I've added a couple of things to it, gloves, band-aids, shield for mouth to mouth. Needles and monofilment.
    I was a Para-rescue troop in the Military so I'm trained in advanced aid, been a few years, but I still remember.
    My kit lives in a pouch in the right bag, used it a few times on myself and others.

    Rog
    Thanks! I've learned a thing or two in 20 years as a street medic.

  11. #11
    25-MPH NEXT 1OO MILES PacWestGS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    N47.06' 204" W122.33' 188" (PacNorthWet)
    Posts
    2,483

    Of course I have a FAK on my bike,

    or in my backpack. But to be honest (and this is not a pat on the back statement). I carry a really sharp "Spyderco" Rescue Knife. It will cut through just about anything and I have learned in my former ways that "Environmentally" you have just about everything you need to patch up someone or make splints and bandages. Infection control is nice, but in the field emergency managment of life-saving even the best sterile dressing gets contaminated.

    I agree with Steve, take classes become better informed and with training you will know what you need that a knife can't fix.

    Bandaids are always in short supply and I hate having things like that in a sealed FAK, I always have extras in a little ziplock with some three-in-one neosporin or Bacitracin ointment.

    I like the cell-phone as long as the batteries are good. Does everyone know that any Cell Phone with or without a service provider or current contract will call 911 if there is a signal? My wife and I have carried my old cell phones in our vehicles just for this purpose.

    The more you know the better it gets...

    Doc

    (EDIT: Tom I forgot to answer your question I bought mine at REI it's made by Adventure Medical Kits and it's called the "Day Tripper". I also have some chemical warm packs for treating hypothermia and a CPR barrier device. All of this fits in the lid (Left Jesse Bag) with other first-responder stuff like road-flares, flashlight and stuff.) HTH - Russ
    Last edited by PacWestGS; 09-10-2006 at 10:06 PM.
    Russ
    "If you took the time to really get to know me...you'd be wasting your time, because I'm exactly who you think I am"

    (Life comes at you pretty fast "Pay it Forward" - Have no regrets when the end happens)

  12. #12
    How cold was it? shoeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Lake Wabaunsee, Kansas
    Posts
    444
    In a backpack shop I found some special wound covers made especially for road rash wounds. I added several of those to my first aid kit. Don't know much about them but figured they might come in handy. ( hope I never need them) Might have been made for bicyclest originally.
    Jim Johnson, OP Kansas
    Marcus Aurelius: "The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane."

  13. #13
    Don't forget your towel
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
    Posts
    838
    EMS is what I do.
    kurt1305 has put together a nice package and rgvilla's education suggestions are spot-on, especially for day-trip scenarios.

    If you are thinking of following in Greg's or Charley and Ewan's footsteps and circumnavigating the globe, headed down to Baja or setting off on the OBDR I'd recommend the Red Cross' Professional Responder Course. More of an investment in terms of dollars and time but it covers things like splinting and longer-term care that they don't touch in the basic courses.

    Steve

  14. #14
    Ambassador Pat Carol's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Hubbard Lake, Michigan
    Posts
    876
    There are several options when it comes too a first aid kit for portability on a motorcycle.
    An inexpensive home made kit can be easily made. You can go to a dollar store and pick up a fanny pack.
    I am no way insulting your intelligence. Visit your local fire department or ambulance service and talk to the men and ladies that work the roads. They
    are the people that are the ones that can steer you in the right direction in carrying pertinent supplies.
    These folks have great knowledge of also using alternative methods for stabilizing an injured rider prior too pre-arrival of EMS personnel. I have worked fire and EMS for 23 years. I never hesitate to educate the public on how to handle and emergency.
    Now another thing you must also look at is the fact that we usually ride our bikes where no person has gone before. So in that case. You may be the first link in the chain of survival. I know this first hand when one of my best friends had a deer fall from the side of a mountain in the Coeur D' Alene National Forest. Thank God my friend suffered only minor injuries and a lump in his shorts. We had no cell phone service. Luckily a passer by went home and called 911.
    Being in the middle of God's Country it took about 2 hours for the fire department and EMS to find us. My friend was stuck with Father Goose (me). So that is why it is very important for you as riders to educate yourself. If you are interested in getting some education, visit you local Red Cross office or speak to your local hospital staff to point you in the right direction on first aid and CPR classes.
    There as been many times that I have utilized civilians that are first aid certified in assistance of a critical patient in the back of my ambulance for patient stabilization. That way we can prepare I.V.'s, cardiac monitor and drug box.
    I hope this information will help you.

    Take Care & Ride Safe
    Pat Carol
    BMW Touring Club Detroit, Ambassador
    BMWMOAF, Past Director
    Selected Friends of Wile E Coyote.
    2013 National Rally First Aid Co-Chair

  15. #15
    Registered User belquar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Jersey Shore
    Posts
    2,011
    Quote Originally Posted by rgvilla
    EMS are usually not far away when called for but if someone is not breathing or has arterial bleeding you might just be able to save them prior to EMS arriving.

    Key word. In VT this summer when me and my sister had to do CPR on that kid it was 30 min before EMS got there and had been called at least 5 min prior to us rendering aid. Unfortunately for Benjamin Willet, the folks who called EMS didn't know how or weren't comfortable attempting to render aid.

    Target has a nice FAK for about 30 bucks. I would recommend repackaging it in a more motorcycle friendly manner.


    http://www.target.com/gp/detail.html...sin=B000A3QLBY

    Click on the view larger image to see the contents. It has some things that you might not want to carry but is a really good kit. You never know where you will be and you might be the biggest difference in whether or not someone lives or dies.

    Brian

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •