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Thread: Roadcrafter, or Darien?

  1. #16
    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toadmanor View Post
    Now I am needing another bit of clarity.

    Is the Roadcrafter equipped with a liner? How is it more finished than the Darien

    The Roadcrafter has a polyester lining, just as you'd find in any riding suit.

    The Darien does not have a lining at all.

    The polyester lining in the Roadcrafter does not make it any warmer to wear when it is hot outside, as one would think. Cooling is done via the zippered vents, not the Gore-Tex.

    Maybe someone can post a pic of the insides of a Darien turned inside out. Its a disappointment. Other than that, I'd buy one.

  2. #17
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalRider View Post
    Maybe someone can post a pic of the insides of a Darien turned inside out. Its a disappointment. Other than that, I'd buy one.
    Pic of the inside of the cuff of a pair of darien pants. The rest of the pants and the inside of the jacket look much the same, save spots with velcro where pads are supposed to mount.



    In the crotch area of the pants the seam can lift. If that happens it can be sent in for repair. Shipping costs more than the repair.
    Last edited by marchyman; 03-30-2014 at 08:25 PM. Reason: Fixed broken link

  3. #18
    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marchyman View Post
    Pic of the inside of the cuff of a pair of darien pants.
    That looks good (condition-wise) compared to the one I saw.

    How old is it and how many miles are on it?

  4. #19
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalRider View Post
    That looks good (condition-wise) compared to the one I saw.

    How old is it and how many miles are on it?
    That is part of the for sale pics of a pair of pants I sold in '07. They were only about 15K miles old. Also, they looked different when new than my first pair. More white than my original pair. The pants do wear much worse than the jacket, though. I had to send my first pair back for seam tape repair after 4 or 5 years.

    A friend is now using the Darien jacket I first bought in March of 99. He bought it from me in '05. He wore it today. It is still waterproof.

  5. #20
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    suits

    I had a Roadcrafter suit but sold it after about a year. Since then I bought a Darien suit and a Darien Light Suit. I love both. It does take a little time to break them in because they are stiff but extremely well made. To break them in, I washed them in just water and then dried them. Washed them about three times and that softened them up a bit. Four years later and they fit like they are part of me. Would never get rid of them. The Darien has a sip out liner which will keep you warm down to about 30 degrees. Very, very well made.

  6. #21
    '99 R1100RT FatBaxter's Avatar
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    I've had a two-piece Roadcrafter for 10 years. It's never leaked, but then I ride a 99 RT and the fairing takes the brunt of bad weather. Which raises a point: behind a fully faired bike, either of the Aerostich suits will be uncomfortably hot in the summer, especially in the deep South (where I live). On a bare bike, you might get enough air flow over your body to wear either one. But not on an RT.

    As a result, in the summer the Aerostich gets put away. The only armored stuff I can abide during the summer behind an RT fairing are Diamond Gusset kevlar-lined jeans, and a kevlar mesh shirt from Draggin' Jeans. When it gets close to 100, even the mesh shirt can be too much behind the fairing.

    In this regard, the RT's fairing works TOO well.

  7. #22
    Registered User 58058D's Avatar
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    I have a two piece RC, only leaked in the crotch once in a very heavy downpour and only when I stopped and put my left leg down. I used nik-wax on the zipper when I got home and every time I wash and renew the waterproofing, and all is well. I have something near 100k miles on it, got it when I commuted daily from Fiddletown to Sacramento, 50 mi one way. Now I ride weekly from the coast to the central valley (Mendo @50 degrees to Sac @100+, 190 mi one way) in most weather until the passes get too icy in winter. With proper hydration and venting control, I have only once had an issue with the heat. 110 and I left my vents closed too long and ended up parboiling myself - bad situation. But, then we do not have the humidity you have in many parts of the country and that really makes a difference with the Stitch in my view. I did get it large enough to wear thermals, elect vest, sweatshirt all layered under (helped when I lost 25 pounds). I have the elipse at the waist as I ride both the K12 with a tall shield and the K13s in a more aggressive position. Got the two piece thinking I would then be able to wear just the jacket at rallies, but rarely separate them and with our roads, never ride without the whole suit.
    Jim Douglas '00 K1200RS >135,000 miles my primary bike again,
    Gone: '09 K1300S sold @ 22k mi, '93 K1100RS traded @ 78k mi, '85 K100RS sold @ 44k mi
    '06 Kaw 650R track bike sold
    http://www.seagullbb.com/

  8. #23
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    Yes, the Roadcrafter is lined. The smooth, thin nylon liner makes it slide on and off easier.

    Overall construction and weight is heavier than the Darien, about a two pound difference for the jacket.

    I have found the one-piece Roadcrafter to be the most versatile for extreme conditions, having ridden in one for more than 300k miles, from temperatures below 0 to 130 above, in snow, ice, rain, hurricanes, and sometimes, even nice weather.

    I cannot recommend a piece of gear more highly than the Roadcrafter.

    John Ryan

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