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f14rio
05-08-2010, 08:10 PM
...to keep my '87 r80 company, unless learned elders here think it may be a POS.
any inputs appreciated before i pull the trigger. i was looking at the r1200r but the complexity (although i'm sure it's reliable as hell) just turned me off.
10-q.
ed flanagan
...
http://triumph.goldcoast-motorsports.com/new_vehicle_detail.asp?sid=02130701X5K8K2010J3I07I 46JPMQ2773R8&veh=183239&CatDesc=Motorcycles&ModelYear=2010

36654
05-08-2010, 09:47 PM
...to keep my '87 r80 company, unless learned elders here think it may be a POS.
any inputs appreciated before i pull the trigger. i was looking at the r1200r but the complexity (although i'm sure it's reliable as hell) just turned me off.
10-q.
ed flanagan
...
http://triumph.goldcoast-motorsports.com/new_vehicle_detail.asp?sid=02130701X5K8K2010J3I07I 46JPMQ2773R8&veh=183239&CatDesc=Motorcycles&ModelYear=2010

What is the actual price? The $8999 MSRP is attractive, so the final deal should be even better.

Haven't they added a counter-balancing shaft to handle the vibration? If so, it looks good to me.

ultracyclist
05-08-2010, 09:52 PM
I will not tell you how to spend your money, but the Scrambler has 2 more inches of distance between the seat and the foot pegs as compared to the Bonny.

Other than the Scrambler having slightly less HP and slightly different gearing, the bikes are basically the same platform.

I recently rode a Bonny, and I felt cramped and the brakes were mediocre at best.

Both are good commuter or day ride bikes. If you want saddle bags than get the Bonny.

My own preference would be to buy a used one about 4 year old. The new ones are made in Asia and I have heard comments about workmanship.

lurk here for awhile:
http://www.triumphrat.net/

jforgo
05-08-2010, 10:49 PM
I will not tell you how to spend your money, but the Scrambler has 2 more inches of distance between the seat and the foot pegs as compared to the Bonny.

Other than the Scrambler having slightly less HP and slightly different gearing, the bikes are basically the same platform.

I recently rode a Bonny, and I felt cramped and the brakes were mediocre at best.

Both are good commuter or day ride bikes. If you want saddle bags than get the Bonny.

My own preference would be to buy a used one about 4 year old. The new ones are made in Asia and I have heard comments about workmanship.

lurk here for awhile:
http://www.triumphrat.net/

The wholw bikes are assembled in Asia? Where?
Or just a lot of components?

jstrube
05-09-2010, 01:00 AM
Made in Asia? Hadn't heard that... I know the 2009 & up are Fuel Injection...

ANDYVH
05-09-2010, 02:10 AM
Same here. I have not read anywhere that any of the current Triumph models are made in Asia? Some of the components are likely made in Asia, but I seriously doubt any complete bikes are made there.

bogthebasher
05-09-2010, 02:25 AM
I picked up a 'pre-owned Bonney (only 980km on the clock for a 2009) this spring for my wife and I to do short commutes and run errands on surface streets in the city. Runs like a top, very flickable, a real joy to ride around town. Yes the brakes are not at all like our RTs, but all in all exactly the bike we wanted for the things we had in mind. Asia? I will have to research that. I can say one thing, their manual is very good and informative along with a helpful book on riding which is as good as the MSF material here in the great white north.

:bikes

bogthebasher
05-09-2010, 02:32 AM
New Bonneville

A completely new Triumph Bonneville 790 was debuted in 2001 by Bloor's Triumph Motorcycles Ltd. Originally built exclusively in Hinckley, England, some models are now produced at the company's Thailand manufacturing facility (which also makes components and accessories for various Triumph bikes). The new "Bonnie" strongly resembles the earlier models in style and basic configuration, but with entirely modern engineering. At the debut the new version was given a 790 cc parallel-twin engine, with the up-spec T100 receiving a 865 cc motor. From 2007 on, all Bonnevilles received the 865 cc motor. Through 2007, all motors had carburetors; electronic fuel injection was then introduced to the 2008 models in Britain and to United States models in the 2009 model year, in both cases to comply with increasingly stringent emissions requirements. "Dummy" carburetors have been added to the 2009 models to retain the original vintage styling of previous years.

All the bikes in Triumph's current "Modern Classics" line are based on the new Bonneville, including the SE, T100, Thruxton, Scrambler, America, and Speedmaster.

In 2006, Triumph launched the "Sixty-8" line of Bonneville accessories, offering vintage and modern-style items including seats, seat covers, cam covers, sprocket covers, petrol tank covers, tank badges, panniers, and other items to allow Bonneville owners the opportunity to customize their bikes for considerably less cost than traditional customizations.

180683
05-09-2010, 04:32 AM
I have a 2008 Scrambler I bought used last year with 700 miles. It will turn over 5k next week.

No reliability issues at all. The bike doesn't have the horsepower of our BMW's but it's a great fun ride and will cruise at 75 with no problems and can do "the ton" if you feel like it. That's plenty fast for me.

I think it's a keeper. It's a different ride than my BMW but a good ride nonetheless.

Joe

osbornk
05-09-2010, 12:42 PM
With the experiences I have had over the years with English made cars, I would thing an Asian made Triumph would be a positive thing.

Ken

milo
05-09-2010, 01:13 PM
I don't believe the Triumph would be a POS. As far as performance it may somewhat duplicate your R80 where the R1200 would be light years ahead in handling, power and braking. Harley's Sportster 1200 may compare with the Bonneville and would price just a little more. (The 883 a little less).
I believe all Triumph twins are made in Thailand now.

Na Cl K9
05-09-2010, 01:19 PM
My friend Ron got a Bonneville to keep his R100S company. He picked it up last week with some nice incentive type extras 'bolted on' and a really swell retro-style Triumph jacket. I would have to say he likes it because while we corresponded regularly up to the point he pulled the trigger on the Triumph. I haven't heard from him in since. I tried to tell him that they are made in China at a factory that also makes 90% of the worlds door hinges now and that Bonneville in Chinese means Submersible Green suitcase but he wouldnt listen

rad
05-09-2010, 01:22 PM
With the experiences I have had over the years with English made cars, I would thing an Asian made Triumph would be a positive thing.

Ken

That is just what I was thinking:laugh

20715
05-09-2010, 04:06 PM
It won't be a POS. I believe Triumph's quality is equal to or better than BMW. (I'm going to be posting a thread about my dilema with my 05 GS either here and/or ADVRider.) At any rate, I had a 2006 Bonnie, only for about a year though. Sold it partly due to a divorce, but mostly because every time I rode it, I found myself wishing I was on my airhead instead. About three months ago, I bought a 2007 Scrambler with only 2500 miles, pristeen condition, with TOR's (off road mufflers - not loud, sound great) for $5200. I'm loving it. Great bike for riding around town and blasting around back roads. It just puts a huge grin on my face. I'm 6'2", and the Scramber does fit me better, but the Bonnie was fine as well.

Most production of the classic twins moved to Thailand with the 2007 model year. I was pleasantly surprised when I went to buy mine it was made in England, but I would have bought it as a Thailand model as well. I've not read of the slightest difference in quality between bikes made in the two countries. They're mostly the final assembly point for components sourced from around the world anyway.

I'd advise you to consider looking at a used one. You can find Bonnies and Scramblers with low miles for not a lot of $$$. They have a reputation of being bullet proof for reliability. If you do go used, look at the 11th digit in the VIN. T = Thailand, J = England. Buy used, and if it turns out to not be to your liking, you can easily sell it without losing a lot of money. Maybe none.

You can read all about them on the RAT forums, including a lengthy thread about England versus Thailand. They went to fuel injection with the 2009 model years. I like FI, but I'm fine with the carbs on my bike. It started easily at below freezing temperatures, and it runs great.

Do some research on the RAT forum. Post a thread asking about any patterns of quality or reliability issues on any of Triumph's modern twins. You'll be surprised, compared to a similar thread about BMW. Look at it this way - buy a used Bonnie or Scrambler, no worries about final drives, EWS failure, fuel mapping and stalling issues, fuel pump controllers, etc. Of course, you'll also get the best of 70's technology. My Scrammy has no ESA, no gear position indicator, no self cancelling turn signals, no fuel gauge, no ABS. Except for the electronic ignition, pretty much the level of technology on my 1975 BMW.

Rpbump
05-09-2010, 07:29 PM
During bike week in Daytona this year BMW of Daytona was selling new Bonnevilles for $6000 plus tax. Ride Safe :usa :usa

jforgo
05-10-2010, 02:00 AM
I'd advise you to consider looking at a used one. You can find Bonnies and Scramblers with low miles for not a lot of $$$. They have a reputation of being bullet proof for reliability. If you do go used, look at the 11th digit in the VIN. T = Thailand, J = England. Buy used, and if it turns out to not be to your liking, you can easily sell it without losing a lot of money. Maybe none.

You can read all about them on the RAT forums, including a lengthy thread about England versus Thailand. They went to fuel injection with the 2009 model years. I like FI, but I'm fine with the carbs on my bike. It started easily at below freezing temperatures, and it runs great.



The twins seem like a modern airhead - similar basic, in more ways than one, niche. Yet personally, I have yet to meet a Bonnie with any sort of miles on it. No scambler run on dirt, either. So far they have all seemed low mile retro toys. If they are like the Triples, that would be very good. I have met all sorts of riders who run the snot out of their Triples, with few or no issues. Not so, with the Twins.

The Triples seem to lose value quickly, despite their positive virtues. Not sure if the same with the Bonnies.
Always best to buy nice used IMHO.

rad
05-10-2010, 03:06 AM
The Thruxton is the best look'n, but make mine a Scrambler, due to an old body....Mine, not the bikes:laugh

Oh ya, gotta have that solo seat:thumb
http://rad.smugmug.com/photos/862122079_Zcyfs-S.jpg

spadoman
05-10-2010, 12:55 PM
My other bike is an '08 Tiger. I was looking at the Scrambler before I decided to buy the G650GS Beemer. I chose the thumper over the Scrambler because of the lighter weight mostly. I think both bikes can do what I wanted the bike to do, (fire trails, gravel and two-lane byways). The Tiger is a great sport tourer. I've ridden a lot of miles on it and I have no problems with Triumph's workmanship and engineering.

r80andr100rt
05-10-2010, 01:59 PM
Have you looked at the Moto Guzzi Classic? It will be my next buy.

http://www.motoguzzi-us.com/en_US/prodotti/naked/v7_classic/v7_classic/default.aspx

Its a shame BMW doesn't make a bike with conventional styling. I have no use for the horse with a broken back look. 12" real wheel clearance on a street bike, and a gas tank designed to maximize lower abdominal injuries.

ultracyclist
05-11-2010, 04:01 AM
A very retro look, and possibly the modern airhead, and anyone with more than a 29 inch inseam will have scrunched legs. Even the reviewers at MCN were a bit cramped. An airhawk for starters for sure, and possibly a custom seat to rider the rider 2 inches is logical.

The Triumph scrambler is far more ergonomically friendly bike. Service is more readily available with Triumph. also as Guzzi is trying to beef up the US presence is dealerships.