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Poskashflo
04-01-2010, 07:27 PM
My b-in-law unfortunately decided to purchase a bike seen on e-Bay from a seller in Rome, Italy. It was a 2006 LT, listed for about $7500. I do not think he actually bought it through e-Bay.

The whole thing sounded fishy to me, but he went ahead and sent, via Western Union, a 50% deposit. They supposedly were using a shipping company called Global-TST. I can't find anything about them and their website is filled with typos. They have continued to ask him for the remaining 50% plus another $1800 "customs tax".

He thinks he is going to get the bike, I say there is no bike and it is a scam.

What do you folks think?

FYI, he has seen no copy of a title, nor Bill of Lading.

S

lkchris
04-01-2010, 07:30 PM
Think he'll find it illegal to import regardless of the details of the sale.

dwestly
04-01-2010, 07:32 PM
Unfortunately from your initial description, I think he's gotten hosed...However he may (or may not) have some recourse through eBay since it was initially advertised there. I would suggest he contact eBay immediately with his concerns, to see if there is any recourse. I would suggest that under NO conditions he send them any more money until the situation is resolved...just my 2 pennies worth. Also, I agree with Kent, even if the offer/sale is legit, the bike is probably not legal for U.S. import, unless it is specifically a U.S. model.

ted
04-01-2010, 07:40 PM
Any time you are asked to wire money via Western Union you are being scammed, period. I have heard of hundreds and hundreds of motorcycle and motorcycle parts transactions where the seller asked for money via Western Union and every single one was a scam. Not one single one, not even one, was legitimate.

Let me guess - the deal is, he wires all the money and they will ship it to him for a 2-week inspection period. If he doesn't like it they will return his money? There is no bike, no customs dues, no shipping fees, nothing but a couple guys sitting in an Internet Cafe in London or Lagos, occasionally going down to Western Union to quite anonymously pick up money wired to them by victims of their scam. Call Western Union's fraud department at 1-800-325-6000, I will bet a case of beer that your brother's first installment was picked up in London or Nigeria.

Your brother is being scammed, probably by someone who hacked an e-Bay account with one of the many eBay phishing e-mails that go out looking in particular for accounts with perfect feedback to use in scams just like this.

Here is one I literally got today:
http://www.verrill.com/misc/ebayphish.jpg

Looks legit doesn't it? Only it isn't. If you click the "Respond Now" button you are taken to a look-alike site hosted on maxwager.com that was set up to do nothing but capture your login and password, and then use your eBay account (and your 100% positive feedback) to run scams just like this. The "Sent to: Undisclosed recipients" is a dead giveaway, and if you hit "View Source" you can see for yourself that even though the link says eBay and is even using eBay's own graphic it is really linked to somewhere else, in this case a site (maxwager.com) registered in Australia with fabulous.com and hosted in London with VPS.net's hosting services. I have already notified them both of the scam, let's hope the Phish site has already been taken down.

Have your brother call the local FBI field office and the local police.

SCJACK
04-01-2010, 07:42 PM
There is a 99.999% chance that this he has been scammed. He should NOT send them another cent.

ted
04-01-2010, 08:21 PM
Some things to read:

eBay Warning (http://reviews.ebay.co.uk/Ten-point-guide-to-avoid-scam-motorcycle-auctions_W0QQugidZ10000000000700822)

eBay Forum for people scammed (http://forums.ebay.com/db2/topic/Escrow-Insurance/Square-Trade-Scam/200082658)

Fraud and Online Vehicle Sales (http://www.carbuyingtips.com/fraud.htm)

86755
04-01-2010, 08:52 PM
Although a different site, I think the same applies here. Craigslist.com explicitly states that any deal that is outside of the USA and requests sending money via Western Union or another money-gram service is likely a scam.

JAMESDUNN
04-01-2010, 10:36 PM
Scam. The other posters are correct. Western Union? Overseas? Banks and many web sites have warnings posted regarding these types of transactions.

akbeemer
04-01-2010, 10:51 PM
Aw, show a little faith in your brother man. Send the money.

piperjim
04-02-2010, 12:43 AM
Ted's nailed it!

Your brother-in-law just got an expensive education.

Another good reason to use your local dealer. Yep, "if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is."

piperjim

Ken F
04-02-2010, 01:25 AM
dont even waste your time calling the FBI or your local police.
They won't do anything. I had the same thing happen on a boat I was trying to sell. The guy sent me a payment in full "Certified bank Draft" on a bank in Dallas which was bogus. At that time I contacted the FBI and the local police.

Playing along, I even went so far as to tell him that something was wrong with the first Bank Draft.......He sent me another from a bank in N.J.

They never did a thing.

460

mchaven
04-02-2010, 01:38 AM
To bring a bit of humor to the situation here's a collection of people messing with foreign scammers.

http://www.419eater.com/index.php

ted
04-02-2010, 01:52 AM
Ahhh - the best ever was the P-P-P-Powerbook :)

Motodan
04-02-2010, 02:06 PM
I hope your brother-in-law is not a financial adviser.

86755
04-02-2010, 02:39 PM
You could try filing a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission.

https://www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov/

Good luck.

squiffynimrod
04-02-2010, 07:11 PM
Ahhh - the best ever was the P-P-P-Powerbook :)

Agreed. Reads like a secret agent novel. Enjoy.

http://www.zug.com/pranks/powerbook/

:thumb

Poskashflo
04-04-2010, 09:20 PM
Thanks everyone:

Just an update on this scam.

After another inquiry as to the status of the bike on Friday, a discussion with " the company" via a "live chat" function off their website, the story got better.

They said that there was a problem and they had been trying to reach my BinLaw. Apparently the seller had been arrested and the bank was holding the "bike" as colateral. They were holding the bike in San Francisco until the debt was repaid. Oh by the way, if another 2000 euro was paid (via Western Union), the bank would release the bike. "You do want your package don't you..?"

I was in error when I mentioned eBay, the bike had been listed in Cycle Trader.

I am curious as to everyone's opinion of the shipping company's website. www.global-tst.com.

Oh, some final depressing news- he had sent all of the money plus the customs request for a total of over $9000. Noooooooooo!

Thanks!

Stuart

Zygmund
04-04-2010, 11:06 PM
Too Bad....
:hungover

piperjim
04-04-2010, 11:17 PM
If there's something similar to Darwin Awards (except, not awarded posthumously), I think your b-in-law would be a strong contender!! I bet he feels real bad! Sorry, there are some scummy people out there trying to get money from us honest folks.

piperjim

marchyman
04-05-2010, 12:13 AM
I am curious as to everyone's opinion of the shipping company's website. www.global-tst.com.



Don't know about the web site, but the domain name was created last May using a registrar in Melbourne, Aust. It's registered owner is hidden with a Sunnyvale, Ca PO box, a SF East Bay phone number, and an email contact that points back to the Melbourne registrar. In other words, they don't want to be found.

ted
04-05-2010, 01:40 AM
Global-Tst.com was registered anonymously and is being hosted on Yahoo in California - you should contact your local FBI field office, they will assist in having the site brought down. Your Brother in Law is probably not the only one being taken by this, be nice to save someone else the grief.

Point them to this site as well, another scam site built by the same scammers:
http://dasfreight.com/
Same *exact* site build, just different domain name (not so curiously, the URL and hosting are also exactly the same as Global-Tst.com as well.) In addition, they might find this tidbit of info also particularly interesting:
http://www.targetgulf.com/MESearch%5CLebanon/DAS_FREIGH_4158.shtml

If you ever needed affirmation that you have been scammed, Google "dasfreight.com".

Sorry to say but your Brother in Law learned a $9k lesson the hard way.

Go to the FBI as soon as possible.

By the way, did he contact Western Union Fraud? Where was the money picked up? I'd also be very interested in looking at one of the e-mails they sent you.

EDIT - these guys are really busy! Clip a sentence of their goofy language (http://www.google.com/search?q=%22WE+RELY+ON+HIGHLY+DISCIPLINED+AND+EDUC ATED+STAFF,+IN+ORDER+TO+MAINTAIN+A+PROSPEROUS+BUSI NESS%22&hl=en&safe=off&filter=0) from the site and Google it, you'll see pages of fake sites these guys have set up.

Motodan
04-05-2010, 11:01 PM
According to Barnum there's one born every minute. This is so stupid it could be made up?

58058D
04-05-2010, 11:35 PM
:bolt

pffog
04-06-2010, 01:23 AM
Not to be rude, but WTF was he thinking???? With all the scams out there, this one not only had enough red flags to fill the UN flag poles, it also had red laser dots all over his forehead, and chest!!!

henzilla
04-06-2010, 02:01 AM
Just a little comment on the Barnum comment...

It is a sad truth that every day folks grandparents, parents and even their young adult children are fooled by some A$$hat on the internet or on the phone. And occasionally by snail mail disguised as official. The stories are endless, the ends the folks go thru to scam others is bolder everyday...y'all remember Bernie Madoff right? Even "smart" folks get burned.

Yes, people make poor decisions...could be someone in your family, so buyer beware!

back to the story...

mchaven
04-06-2010, 10:11 PM
Just a little comment on the Barnum comment...

It is a sad truth that every day folks grandparents, parents and even their young adult children are fooled by some A$$hat on the internet or on the phone. And occasionally by snail mail disguised as official. The stories are endless, the ends the folks go thru to scam others is bolder everyday...y'all remember Bernie Madoff right? Even "smart" folks get burned.

Yes, people make poor decisions...could be someone in your family, so buyer beware!

back to the story...



2 days after she got her computer in 2001 (and still using the same computer. I'd go mad!) my grandmother got her first scam email. It was one of the fake ebay sites, attempting to get your username/password. She had no idea what it was and called me (since I get to be tech support for the whole family)
"Mick, do I ebay?"
"Did you sign up for ebay?"
"I don't think so. Is that in the start menu?"
"No grandma. Have you ever been to ebay.com?"
"No."
"Then don't listen to that email. Its a scam"
"What kind of terrible people would try and scam little old ladies on the internet?"
"Typically africans, grandma"
*racist remark from Grandma here*

Least that conversation made her wary of the emails from the Nigerian Bank President and what not.

UncleMark
04-06-2010, 10:23 PM
Seems I had to say something about this back in May of '09...

http://expressoriders.org/UMBlog/2009/05/

If we are smart enough to not get burned by these idiots, why are we not telling others about it and helping them keep "what's theirs" safe and secure?

ted
04-06-2010, 10:31 PM
Unfortunately the Nigerians really turned it into an industry. I would say even today after many years following these I find a significant portion of the scams I come across still come from Nigeria, though more and more are coming from Italy, the UK and Russia (and former Soviet States).

If you want to see where these things come from just look at the header info of the email for something like this "X-SENDER IP:" or "RECEIVED: FROM" followed by an IP Address, aka four blocks of one to three numbers each. For example, the eBay phish I referred to above has this statement in the headers:


Received: from User ([195.81.7.217])

Hopping over to SamSpade.org and punching in "195.81.7.217" I found that it was originally sent from an ISP in Italy through an unprotected mail server of a law firm in New Milford, Connecticut (yes I called them and told them.

marchyman
04-07-2010, 12:20 AM
If you want to see where these things come from just look at the header info of the email for something like this "X-SENDER IP:" or "RECEIVED: FROM" followed by an IP Address, aka four blocks of one to three numbers each. For example, the eBay phish I referred to above has this statement in the headers:


Good advise with a big caveat... Received headers can be forged. :deal

Proper received headers are added by each machine that processes the message. This will typically be the senders host, his ISP's mail server, your ISP mail server, etc. However, because headers can be forged the ONLY received header you can believe is the one that your mail server added. That will be the first one found (hosts add headers to the beginning of the message).

If you get a mail that claims to be from paypal.com, for example, but the top receive header says that it came from cable-user-35.someisp.example.com you can be 100% sure it isn't a valid message from paypal even if later received headers make it look like the message transited paypal hosts.