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ultracyclist
03-14-2010, 03:38 PM
This thread is a spin off from the "R1200....unappreciated..." by fastdogs2.

Is it my imagination? Are more people going from RT types to R types than the other way around?

If that is the case, then why don't naked bikes sell in the US?

empeg9000
03-14-2010, 03:53 PM
Not me. I will stick with my RT for now.

AZ-J
03-14-2010, 04:10 PM
I am very happy with my R1200S now.

Too bad BMW killed it for the HP2 Sport in the US, and now the latter is largely gone (except as used).

You can ride it "naked" sitting upright, or faired laying on the tank. And, it has more power and wider wheels than an R bike, too.

jforgo
03-14-2010, 07:05 PM
It depends on where you live, and your riding style. When I lived in Southern California, I had only one faired bike, which I only used occasionaly. And I did not own a car for many years.
Now that I live where it gets much colder, I only have one unfaired bike. The BMW fairings on my bikes also work very well in this land of many high winds. My riding season is greatly extended throughout the year, as long as there is no black ice. I only have lowers on one of them. Commuting, light shopping, events, etc always on bike, weather permitting.
When I lived in SoCal, faired bikes, if you don't count little cafed crotch rocket affairs, were relatively rare. Around here, even the crusty primer painted Harley riders (not posers) usually run at least large clear windshields, if not full baggers. Almost never saw that in SoCal.

Trickster
03-14-2010, 07:05 PM
This thread is a spin off from the "R1200....unappreciated..." by fastdogs2.

Is it my imagination? Are more people going from RT types to R types than the other way around?

If that is the case, then why don't naked bikes sell in the US?

It is your imagination,:laugh and yes naked bikes do sell, just there may be more fairing styled bikes available now than in the past. Look at the selection of bikes availalbe on the market today, choices galore, accessories available for new bikes the moment they come out (S1000RR).

Just look at the number of companys' producing windshields now, takes all day just to go thru the selections available, which is gr8.

Hell up here in Canada if you don't have a fairing, your freezing your butt off for 4 months of the 5 months we get to ride.:banghead

akbeemer
03-14-2010, 07:30 PM
I have an RT and plan on sticking with it for the foreseeable future. I can see going with a roadster in the future. The R seems a more simple ride than the RT particularly at low speeds and that is a growing factor.

PowderkegPete
03-14-2010, 09:18 PM
I agree with AZ-J. BMW Motorrad made a big mistake when they discontinued the R1200S in favor of the HPs. I suppose they thought that they could compete better with the huge number of very popular naked Ducs out there. I love the R1200S and the R1200R but neither of them is going to compete with the Salami Rockets. Because the R1200R doesn't compete well in the naked bike marketplace, I hope Motorrad doesn't discontinue it. In these economic times I think there is definitely a place for a more basic bike that is cheaper to maintain than fully faired bikes. I think Motorrad would be smart to come out with a new cam-head R1200 series in three variants -- naked, bikini fairing and one with sport touring bodywork.

Pete

AZ-J
03-14-2010, 09:31 PM
I agree with AZ-J. ... I love the R1200S and the R1200R but neither of them is going to compete with the Salami Rockets. ... I think Motorrad would be smart to come out with a new cam-head R1200 series in three variants -- naked, bikini fairing and one with sport touring bodywork.

Pete

Thanks for the agreement, PkP, but I have to say I disagree with "neither of them is going to compete with the Salami Rockets" at least to the extent the R12S could have done "it" much better than the HP2 S ever did. All BMW needed to do was market it. But instead, since it was only sold for some 12-14 months, here, it never had a chance in the US.

ALIENHITCHHIKER
03-14-2010, 09:49 PM
I rode home from work on my RT this past Friday in a 50 degree rain - windy, cold nasty weather - but pulled into the garage warm, dry and smiling

On the way I passed a rider on a naked cruiser. He looked cold, he looked wet and and he looked frazzled. He did not wave back.

'Nuff said.

JAMESDUNN
03-14-2010, 10:00 PM
Trends come and go. I think the current move toward naked bikes is rat inspired to a degree. Sportbikes that are wrecked are oft times "ratted out" instead of replacing damaged parts. That plastic is hard on a young rider's wallet! Anyway, what is left is a nude rat bike, and it has figured in the stying of bikes by Ducati, Suzuki and Yamaha to name a few. There is also a trend toward purism and simplicity. Fairings are wonderful but require removal for maintenance among other considerations. I personally love unadorned motors but like the weather protection fairings offer. On the other hand a naked bike is in my future, but I'll hang on to my faired machines thank you.

By the by, I do think naked bikes are selling. How else to explain the jump into this market by the manufacturers?
JD

AZ-J
03-14-2010, 10:16 PM
I rode home from work on my RT this past Friday in a 50 degree rain - windy, cold nasty weather - but pulled into the garage warm, dry and smiling

On the way I passed a rider on a naked cruiser. He looked cold, he looked wet and and he looked frazzled. He did not wave back.

'Nuff said.

Too bad for you, you have weather like that. Sunny and 63 right now, and we should hit 80 Tuesday or Wednesday.

ALIENHITCHHIKER
03-15-2010, 01:01 AM
Too bad for you, you have weather like that. Sunny and 63 right now, and we should hit 80 Tuesday or Wednesday.

.

AZ-J
03-15-2010, 01:44 AM
I'll refrain Mr. Hitchhiker from sending you my best picture response as well.

valvman1
03-15-2010, 02:40 AM
If you happen to live in those 'southern climes' year round riding is easy, but for many of the rest of us, that have actual cold weather, a good fairing makes a big difference.
Until Oct '08 I had never ridden a bike w/ a fairing. That's when I bought my R1200RT. All I can say is, that at my age ( 65 ), this has made a huge difference in my
comfort level, 200 mi rides at 20-25 degrees F. Rain,even cold, no problem.
I live in north west NJ and ride mostly upstate NY....the roads there are a lot of fun
though they tend to be rather tricky in winter.
Tho' this bike has a full fairing, it suffers nothing in the handling/performance
department.... I'm not crazy but I'm not slow...Ex: I'm happy to get 5000 mi on a
set of PR2's. Will I get another unfaired bike ? If I do it will probably be a F800GS
or something along those lines.
Even in cold weather I average 1500 mi/ month and have over 32000 very satisfying
miles on this bike.
Fairing....YES.

Dave Bogue
'08 R 1200RT

sdpc2
03-15-2010, 05:00 PM
i love the handling of the roadster......

but i own an RT! :bolt

lkchris
03-15-2010, 05:08 PM
If you don't count the GS as a faired bike--and you shouldn't--then you can conclude unfaired bikes are selling quite nicely.

bogthebasher
03-15-2010, 10:22 PM
I rode home from work on my RT this past Friday in a 50 degree rain - windy, cold nasty weather - but pulled into the garage warm, dry and smiling

On the way I passed a rider on a naked cruiser. He looked cold, he looked wet and and he looked frazzled. He did not wave back.

'Nuff said.

LOL Heck more than once I've stuck my hand out to wave and quickly yanked it back, only then remembering it was wet out there!

Anyname
03-15-2010, 11:36 PM
Too bad for you, you have weather like that. Sunny and 63 right now, and we should hit 80 Tuesday or Wednesday.

I attended University in Burlington Vt. While I was there, I met a young lady from Louisiana who said she preferred the cold of Vt. to the heat of LA. Her reasoning was you can only take so much clothing off, but there is no limit to how much you can add. So when it's 110 degrees in AZ, we'll be riding in comfort (and probably a rainstorm as well).

lkchris
03-16-2010, 02:58 PM
I rode home from work on my RT this past Friday in a 50 degree rain - windy, cold nasty weather - but pulled into the garage warm, dry and smiling

On the way I passed a rider on a naked cruiser. He looked cold, he looked wet and and he looked frazzled. He did not wave back.

'Nuff said.

Couple years ago rode all over Arizona and western New Mexico on my R80G/S with a couple friends with KLRs. We then stopped at my home in Albuquerque and I then rode my R100RS with them over to an Airhead rally in Oklahoma. The RS was heaven in comparison.

It's really a myth that fairings are hot, BTW. If it's hot outside, the fairing reduces the blast of hot air--which is the significant thing. It reduces the accompanying dehydration as well. If all you're going to do is ride around town or offroad, a bare bike is fine (and maybe preferrable). Otherwise a fairing improves everything.

So, quoted poster notes faired bike better in cold, wet weather. I note they're better in hot, dry weather, too.

ragtoplvr
03-16-2010, 03:56 PM
To me a air/oil cooled boxer with frame mounted faring and adjustable windshield is optimum. The frame mount mostly decouples the wind from the steering. The boxer is inherently cooler in hot weather than any water cooled bike I have experienced. You can adjust the windshield to get more noise or more air as needed. A light naked bike with some good bags would make a nice city/adventure bike, but can not go on long trip as comfortable. Since I can only afford one bike, I choose a fairing.

Rod

Kirbster919
03-16-2010, 06:22 PM
I appreciate having two bikes. Around town, a naked airhead is tons of fun. On long trips, a fairing makes it much much more pleasant.

For me, it isn't even so much the weather but rider fatigue. After 50 brisk highway miles on a naked bike, I notice some effort. Not enough to stop me, as I have no issues doing 600 mile days on naked bikes, but it isn't as comfortable from an endurance standpoint. I'm only 21, so I'm sure in 20 years I'll spend more time before a fairing.

rad
03-16-2010, 07:09 PM
.........
Is it my imagination? Are more people going from RT types to R types than the other way around? .............

Not anybody I know. The ones I know have gone from bikes like the GS to an RT. Another guy I know just did the GS to a 09' RT last week.

About 10 years ago there was a big shift as a lot of RT riders went the way of the GS.

dbriggs2000
03-17-2010, 01:26 AM
I live in San Diego and used to ride a Harley Softail. I'd go out for a 100 mile ride on a Saturday morning and come back rattled and tired. The bike would begin to feel unstable and slippery at above 80 mph. Now I have a '09 R12RT and love it. At 100 miles I'm just getting started on a typical ride. I come home refreshed and invigorated after a good SoCal cruise in the back country...

osbornk
03-17-2010, 02:47 AM
Back in the 80s, after riding naked chain driven bikes on long and tiring rides, I swore I would never have another bike with a chain and without a fairing or windshield. Since then, I have had shaft driven bikes with wind protection and I don't plan on changing. I'm not sure I could handle 300 miles of fighting the wind at high speed at my age.

Ken F
03-17-2010, 03:54 AM
Osbornk, your post made me smile.....I spent 30 some odd years riding harleys, Choppers, rigid frames, springer front ends...no front brakes, then dressers. I'm with ya. I remember riding 150 miles and being glad that we didn't have to go any further! Now with the Beemers, a 150 is just a tease, and leaves you wanting more.

I'm riding a R11RSl, and find it to be a good compromise between a naked bike, and a full faired bike.

460

MAYLETT
03-17-2010, 04:07 AM
Here in Utah we get some reasonably cold winters with a good deal of snow. Despite that, I continued riding my RT throughout the winter. It wasn't every day ÔÇö snow and ice limited the riding, but I don't think I went a week without riding at least some. Not once was I cold, despite temperatures sometimes in the teens F.

I've noticed a progression in the types of bikes I see as winter slowly eases into spring. During the winter, half of the very few motorbikes I see are BMWs. Long about the first of March, when the temperatures start tickling the mid and high 40s, the lightly faired, mid-sized Japanese sport bikes start showing up. About mid March, as temperatures ease into the low 50s, the naked sport bikes make their appearance. Next, around April 1 and temperatures around 60, the fully loaded touring bikes start hitting the road. It's not until temperatures work their way up to the high 60s and low 70s that the naked cruisers make it out of their garages (along with their largely bare-headed riders).

When it comes right down to it, I like to ride and hate putting the bike away for three, four or five months. An RT is as close to a four-season bike as you'll probably find. The extended season capabilities are one of the main reasons I bought it, and this past winter, I wasn't disappointed a bit. An no complaints in the summer either.

criminaldesign
03-17-2010, 05:56 AM
naked looks better but even the smallest shield makes a world of difference.

henzilla
03-17-2010, 02:39 PM
About 10 years ago there was a big shift as a lot of RT riders went the way of the GS.



I did it last year... Already had a GS,the first one by trading a fellow my Heritage Classic in '06, sold the Hex RT last June and added another lightly faired K12S.

The GSA has the same tank lines/knee protection as the RT had and almost the same wind protection...just way more fun for me.
I just felt I wasn't old enough to drive the 4 door sedan yet so the RT went:stick :laugh:laugh:laugh It was my first Beemer, but I was coming off a cruiser and was not sure what BMW suited me...guess I still don't with the bikes we have between us:whistle

AZ-J
03-17-2010, 03:42 PM
Steve,

You need to try a R11/R12 S model!

lkchris
03-17-2010, 04:09 PM
About 10 years ago there was a big shift as a lot of RT riders went the way of the GS.

That would be 2000. Try 1987, when the alternative to the K-bike was the R100GS. THAT moved lots of folks to the GS, an easy decision. IIRC, GS has been top seller since.

DaveSlash5
03-18-2010, 01:19 AM
I have had both faired and unfaired bikes in my 26 years of riding but currently ride my R1150R. Down here in the South it gets cold in the winter, but Danged Hot and Humid in the summer.
With a naked bike, I can ride with no fairing in hot weather, a sport screen in middlin' weather, a touring shield in the cool or rain, or even make it a fully faired bike by fitting on a Hannigan fairing if I wish. Whatever suits my need.
So no more cooking behind a fairing at 95 degrees and 90% humidity or freezing at 35 degrees and drizzle.
Therefore I declare the naked bike A Bike for All Seasons!

Rpbump
03-18-2010, 05:31 AM
For travel over 200 miles I prefer a bike with a fairing (my CLC). For local trips in the summer heat/humidity a naked bike ( my Softtail or Sportster).
Ride Safe :usa :usa

henzilla
03-18-2010, 06:40 PM
Steve,

You need to try a R11/R12 S model!

She has one of those I get to ride as well...an 00 1100S. very peppy 1100 engine and a smile factor as well.

And did get a short ride on a yellow R12S about a year ago...very nice as well:dance
Rare birds around here

cycleman2
04-03-2010, 11:40 PM
I rode home from work on my RT this past Friday in a 50 degree rain - windy, cold nasty weather - but pulled into the garage warm, dry and smiling

On the way I passed a rider on a naked cruiser. He looked cold, he looked wet and and he looked frazzled. He did not wave back.

'Nuff said.

I was out in 50 degree weather on my 1100R. Bike just has the stock windshield. I have to use the layer principle, along with a vest and some good riding gear and its OK. Went on a 130 mile drive. Not as comfortable as a full faired bike but it has other advantages.

One thing I have learned is you can always add more clothes but you can only remove so many when it gets hot.

AndresS
04-04-2010, 09:24 AM
Something about the wind in my face (ok, visor) is what biking is all about for moi. Finally shopped off some of my K100's shield and not only did it become a different bike for me, I became a LOT happier with it!! Wind in my face and clear unobstructed view:dance it don't get any better than that!!

RandallIsland
04-04-2010, 09:31 AM
... then why don't naked bikes sell in the US?

I can show you with pictures....













...one sec...

dhgeyer
04-04-2010, 12:57 PM
I just got back from a "shakedown" cruise on my new R12R. Only 430 miles out and about the same back, which I know is not long by BMW standards. I wanted to see how it would go. I have the hardbags, a topcase, and a small tank bag. Plenty of room for any trip I'm likely to do, including a planned coast to coast.

I've been experimenting with windshields. I got the BMW touring windshield mount, and a Cee Bailey 22" shield that fits on it. Total disaster. Buffeted my head so badly that I lasted about 10 minutes on the highway before I had a headache and was seeing double. So I started cutting it down. When I got to about 10", it stopped buffeting my head but still kept the pressure off my chest. So that's a sport shield now, and I like it. Cool in Summer, light, no interference with vision, fun.

But I still wanted a touring shield. So, I ordered the Cee Bailey 26" shield. Still got more buffeting than I will tolerate. I really wanted to make this work. First, I drilled 3 1" holes just above the instrument cluster. Helped a little. Touring and sport touring bikes usually have some kind of venting in about that position.

Then I took off for Buffalo (from NH) with a roll of duct tape and some pieces of cardboard. Usually if you can block the air from coming up behind the shield in the right place you can stop the buffeting. That's what fairings do, among other things. Well, on the third try I got it. I blocked the area from the handlebars roughly straight down to the tank on both sides. Took a lot of duct tape! The "blocker" extends from near the outside of the tank to about 2" from the middle on each side at the bottom, and from the handgrip assembly to the bar mounts on top. It was constructed with the bars turned to full lock left to do the right side and vice versa. It has to be flexible so the bars can turn, obviously. I did everything with a double layer, facing each other for strength and to avoid leaving exposed sticky surfaces.

Anyway, for the remainder of the trip I was behind a touring shield in about the quietest ride I've ever had on a bike at 70+ mph. I rode in temps from 39 degrees and drizzle to 83 and bright Sun. If anything the shield is a bit too tall now. If I sit perfectly straight I can see over it, but I'm mostly looking through it. 22" would be way too short, but I think I an take an inch or maybe an inch and a half off without getting that annoying noise on top of my helmet. Or I may leave it alone. It's great for the highway the way it is.

Lesson one: if you buy a Cee Bailey shield for a Roadster, don't pay any attention to their height chart. You'll end up with something way too short.

As soon as I got back I tore the whole thing off and put my sport shield back on, which took maybe 3 minutes. I also took off all the luggage except the small tank bag. I went from a thoroughly competent touring machine to a great, lightweight all around fun bike in less than 5 minutes.

What is left to do is to construct those air blockers out of something a little more elegant than duct tape, and a little easier to mount and dismount.

So, as has been said before, I think you can add stuff to the Roadster to make it virtually as good as the RT for touring, and take the stuff off to have all the advantages of a naked bike. While the lower part of the Roadster doesn't have the protection of an RT, I find that the shape of the tank and front end do a pretty good job of keeping my legs out of the worst of the weather.

Seems like the ideal world to me! I wouldn't trade.

GlobalRider
04-04-2010, 01:16 PM
If that is the case, then why don't naked bikes sell in the US?

Its probably an image thing.

If riders can't handle wind blast or the seat that the bike comes with, why don't they just get into their car?

jforgo
04-04-2010, 06:16 PM
A lot of the new naked bikes are marketed as "streetfighters" - and I do see lots of them.
No way to tell due which extent these are selling; riding style preference, or lower purchase and insurance cost, or simpler maintenance access/lower service cost.

deilenberger
04-04-2010, 06:46 PM
It's really a myth that fairings are hot, BTW. Ummm... am I correct in assuming you've never ridden an '85 K100RT in 90F temps? :bolt

deilenberger
04-04-2010, 07:08 PM
I'll just add to the comments on the R12R as a year round bike.

I was off mine for 3 weeks this winter.. because of ice and snow on my driveway. Other than the 3 weeks - I've been out for a ride every week since.. well.. for the past 3 years (with the exception of a car-trip or two vacation with SWMBO.)

I have a collection of windshields for the Roadster - and three are regularly used - all from Cee-Bailey. 18" for summer, 20" for spring/fall and 22" for winter use. One thing a bunch of us on the R12R specific forum at: http://www.r1150r.org/board/viewforum.php?f=20 found - the BMW "tall/touring" bracket doesn't provide the optimal angle for the shields. Tilting it back further torward the rider makes a BIG difference in buffetting and noise. Lots of details and how people have done it on the forum (search "windshield".)

Most of the people on that forum consider the R12R (1) the best bike they've ever owned (2) an all-year bike. It is trivial to switch windshields on the bike since most of the popular ones use the same mount (from BMW).. there are several fork mounted small fairings available for people who want more protection (they are still small compared to an RT.)

Temps down into low 30's are no problem if you equip the bike and yourself properly. Bike needs handguards, some sort of shield to keep the major wind blast off you, heated grips (I think ALL the R12R's were delivered with them.) Rider needs decent protective gear, a heated jacket liner, a silk balaclava (makes a major difference) and gauntlet type gloves. I add to that when it's really cold some hippo-hand sort of things (much smaller than the real ones) available from Wunderlich - and I never need high on the heated grips.

So equipped - aside from bad road conditions - not much will keep me off the bike. Rain/cold - meh. It's time to ride! I went from being a 4-5,000 mile a year rider to a 12,000 mile a year rider on the R12R. My former bikes (not counting the ones when I was much younger) were K100RT (HOT!), K75S, and R1150RS. None of them was as much fun, or as addicting to ride as the "naked" R12R is for me. And I hate cold.

Do I see more naked bikes being bought? Well.. our local club (about 68 members at the moment) has 3 R1200R owners in it, some Boxters, an R1100R Roadster, and a lot of GS owners. There is one remaining LT owner, and a few RT owners. The majority of bikes in the parking lot for a club meeting - even Decembers meeting - are what would be considered naked bikes.

osbornk
04-04-2010, 07:26 PM
Ummm... am I correct in assuming you've never ridden an '85 K100RT in 90F temps? :bolt

Yep. I sold it and bought a K75RT with the identical fairing with the identical windshield (Parabellum). The heat problem wasn't the fairing.

It bothers me when I am riding a naked bike on a hot day and it feels like I have a hair dryer blowing in my face.

Zygmund
04-04-2010, 11:13 PM
Wow, this sounds like my cousin that rides a Harley, he asked about heated kneepads!
:laugh

dougfollett
04-05-2010, 02:08 AM
My first bikes back in the 60s were all open bikes. When I eventually got back into bikes again it was on an R80RT. Here in the Pacific North Wet the cold and wet seasons can be downright miserable for a rider. The R80RT though was a joy to ride on a cold night and not too bad in the rain either. It would keep me fairly dry in a good downpour if I wasn't out too long. Later I purchased a R1100RT with a smaller fairing and an adjustable windshield. In some ways I missed the larger, more protective fairing but I find now that I more often than not ride with the windshield in the down position. If it gets really cold I'll raise it a bit but not all the way unless it is really coming down and freezing. Last week I bought an R100GS with a postage stamp of a windshield and I'm loving it. I love all of my bikes.

zoridog
04-05-2010, 03:16 AM
I just mounted a fairing to my only naked bike. Besides my preference for fairing mounted mirrors, I find that faired bikes allow you to carry a lot fewer clothes. It seemed I was adding or removing layers every ten degree change or in windy areas.

Also, the fairing is just more comfortable in wind and much quieter. A more pleasant ride experience. But, to each is own.

RandallIsland
04-05-2010, 06:01 AM
Ummm... am I correct in assuming you've never ridden an '85 K100RT in 90F temps? :bolt

+1 :ha

mistercindy
04-05-2010, 03:22 PM
I compromise because I have room for only one bike in the stable. I ride an R12GS, a naked bike, with an Aeroflow. Its a great combination of nakedness and protection.





I just got back from a "shakedown" cruise on my new R12R. Only 430 miles out and about the same back, which I know is not long by BMW standards. I wanted to see how it would go. I have the hardbags, a topcase, and a small tank bag. Plenty of room for any trip I'm likely to do, including a planned coast to coast.

I've been experimenting with windshields. I got the BMW touring windshield mount, and a Cee Bailey 22" shield that fits on it. Total disaster. Buffeted my head so badly that I lasted about 10 minutes on the highway before I had a headache and was seeing double. So I started cutting it down. When I got to about 10", it stopped buffeting my head but still kept the pressure off my chest. So that's a sport shield now, and I like it. Cool in Summer, light, no interference with vision, fun.

But I still wanted a touring shield. So, I ordered the Cee Bailey 26" shield. Still got more buffeting than I will tolerate. I really wanted to make this work. First, I drilled 3 1" holes just above the instrument cluster. Helped a little. Touring and sport touring bikes usually have some kind of venting in about that position.

Then I took off for Buffalo (from NH) with a roll of duct tape and some pieces of cardboard. Usually if you can block the air from coming up behind the shield in the right place you can stop the buffeting. That's what fairings do, among other things. Well, on the third try I got it. I blocked the area from the handlebars roughly straight down to the tank on both sides. Took a lot of duct tape! The "blocker" extends from near the outside of the tank to about 2" from the middle on each side at the bottom, and from the handgrip assembly to the bar mounts on top. It was constructed with the bars turned to full lock left to do the right side and vice versa. It has to be flexible so the bars can turn, obviously. I did everything with a double layer, facing each other for strength and to avoid leaving exposed sticky surfaces.

Anyway, for the remainder of the trip I was behind a touring shield in about the quietest ride I've ever had on a bike at 70+ mph. I rode in temps from 39 degrees and drizzle to 83 and bright Sun. If anything the shield is a bit too tall now. If I sit perfectly straight I can see over it, but I'm mostly looking through it. 22" would be way too short, but I think I an take an inch or maybe an inch and a half off without getting that annoying noise on top of my helmet. Or I may leave it alone. It's great for the highway the way it is.

Lesson one: if you buy a Cee Bailey shield for a Roadster, don't pay any attention to their height chart. You'll end up with something way too short.

As soon as I got back I tore the whole thing off and put my sport shield back on, which took maybe 3 minutes. I also took off all the luggage except the small tank bag. I went from a thoroughly competent touring machine to a great, lightweight all around fun bike in less than 5 minutes.

What is left to do is to construct those air blockers out of something a little more elegant than duct tape, and a little easier to mount and dismount.

So, as has been said before, I think you can add stuff to the Roadster to make it virtually as good as the RT for touring, and take the stuff off to have all the advantages of a naked bike. While the lower part of the Roadster doesn't have the protection of an RT, I find that the shape of the tank and front end do a pretty good job of keeping my legs out of the worst of the weather.

Seems like the ideal world to me! I wouldn't trade.

Reading your post reminds me of the contortions I went through trying to make the R12GS work without the insane buffeting. I finally bit the bullet and bought an Aeroflow. But if you look at the page on Aeroflow's website that lists all bikes for which they make a screen(LINK (http://www.aeroflowscreens.com/products.htm)), you don't see the R12R. I wonder why?

cycleman2
04-05-2010, 11:47 PM
I just got back from a "shakedown" cruise on my new R12R. Only 430 miles out and about the same back, which I know is not long by BMW standards. I wanted to see how it would go. I have the hardbags, a topcase, and a small tank bag. Plenty of room for any trip I'm likely to do, including a planned coast to coast.

I've been experimenting with windshields. I got the BMW touring windshield mount, and a Cee Bailey 22" shield that fits on it. Total disaster. Buffeted my head so badly that I lasted about 10 minutes on the highway before I had a headache and was seeing double. So I started cutting it down. When I got to about 10", it stopped buffeting my head but still kept the pressure off my chest. So that's a sport shield now, and I like it. Cool in Summer, light, no interference with vision, fun.

But I still wanted a touring shield. So, I ordered the Cee Bailey 26" shield. Still got more buffeting than I will tolerate. I really wanted to make this work. First, I drilled 3 1" holes just above the instrument cluster. Helped a little. Touring and sport touring bikes usually have some kind of venting in about that position.

Then I took off for Buffalo (from NH) with a roll of duct tape and some pieces of cardboard. Usually if you can block the air from coming up behind the shield in the right place you can stop the buffeting. That's what fairings do, among other things. Well, on the third try I got it. I blocked the area from the handlebars roughly straight down to the tank on both sides. Took a lot of duct tape! The "blocker" extends from near the outside of the tank to about 2" from the middle on each side at the bottom, and from the handgrip assembly to the bar mounts on top. It was constructed with the bars turned to full lock left to do the right side and vice versa. It has to be flexible so the bars can turn, obviously. I did everything with a double layer, facing each other for strength and to avoid leaving exposed sticky surfaces.

Anyway, for the remainder of the trip I was behind a touring shield in about the quietest ride I've ever had on a bike at 70+ mph. I rode in temps from 39 degrees and drizzle to 83 and bright Sun. If anything the shield is a bit too tall now. If I sit perfectly straight I can see over it, but I'm mostly looking through it. 22" would be way too short, but I think I an take an inch or maybe an inch and a half off without getting that annoying noise on top of my helmet. Or I may leave it alone. It's great for the highway the way it is.

Lesson one: if you buy a Cee Bailey shield for a Roadster, don't pay any attention to their height chart. You'll end up with something way too short.

As soon as I got back I tore the whole thing off and put my sport shield back on, which took maybe 3 minutes. I also took off all the luggage except the small tank bag. I went from a thoroughly competent touring machine to a great, lightweight all around fun bike in less than 5 minutes.

What is left to do is to construct those air blockers out of something a little more elegant than duct tape, and a little easier to mount and dismount.

So, as has been said before, I think you can add stuff to the Roadster to make it virtually as good as the RT for touring, and take the stuff off to have all the advantages of a naked bike. While the lower part of the Roadster doesn't have the protection of an RT, I find that the shape of the tank and front end do a pretty good job of keeping my legs out of the worst of the weather.

Seems like the ideal world to me! I wouldn't trade.

I've read your discription of blockers with interest. To bad you don't have a picture. That's what I'm currently trying to build on mine using 16 gauge aluminium. I was out in the garage today and got one built and will try & do the other one tonight. Mine are about 3 inches wide & about 5 inches tall, bent in a curve and are being designed to catch the air between the headlight & signallight and direct it up to cut down on the negative pressure behind the windshield.

I'm currently running the stock shield and thought I'd try these first & see how they work. If they don't then I'll either make them bigger or move onto designing something that will pick up some air between the headlight & shield and direct it up.

dhgeyer
04-06-2010, 12:31 PM
I've read your discription of blockers with interest. Too bad you don't have a picture.

I'm still toying with different approaches. When I am satisfied that I have something that 1) works, 2) doesn't look too horrible, and 3) is easy to take on and off, I'll take some pictures and post them.

I tried the trick of angling the shield back using a spacer under the front of the mount. That seems to have made matters worse in my case. My Cee Baily shield is about 24.5" high since I took a bit off the original 26". I think I have the height right for what I want, which is the quietest, least buffeting ride possible up to about 75mph, with the ability to look over the windshield rather than through it. I have a duct tape based prototype that works, but is obviously unsightly, and not easy to get on and off.

cycleman2
04-06-2010, 12:47 PM
I have another shield that I've used on my bike and it is much larger. I think its similar to a National Cycle standard one that fits multiple bikes. I've tried it on the bike and the buffetting is alsmost nil. It differs from the stock shield in that it is much wider and curves to help protect your hands and then goes down behind the signal lights for about 3-4 inches.

This windshield is slightly taller than the stock but whereas the stock one tends to dip down in the centre at the top this one is more rounded.

I would use this one but I find that it applifies the engine noise, and also being much bigger acts more like a sail and I don't really like that feeling at 75 + mph. I like the way the bike handles with the stock shield and don't mind its smaller size just working on trying to get the buffetting down. The stock shield works well until you get over 50 mph or so then the buffetting starts and just gets worse & worse the faster you go.

In reading info on buffetting on other sites I see the addition of lowers on a lot of cruisers elimated the buffetting. It seems that they drive some air up behind the screen which neutralizes the negative pressure somewhat. Air doesn't like a vaccum so its going to try & fill it. Thats what I'm trying to create & it sounds like you are doing the same.

deilenberger
04-06-2010, 01:36 PM
I tried the trick of angling the shield back using a spacer under the front of the mount. That seems to have made matters worse in my case. My Cee Baily shield is about 24.5" high since I took a bit off the original 26". I think I have the height right for what I want, which is the quietest, least buffeting ride possible up to about 75mph, with the ability to look over the windshield rather than through it. I have a duct tape based prototype that works, but is obviously unsightly, and not easy to get on and off.

Something a number of people found - a tankbag quiets things down. The two U shaped cutouts in the front of the tank for the fork legs apparently channel a lot of air up behind the shield. Without a tank bag, it appears this air causes more turbulence and noise. With a tank bag it seems greatly reduced. I suspect the same effect as the duct-tape block you made.

Since I always ride with a tank bag, can't say if this is true. Guess I could try taking mine off someday and going for a ride, but I'd feel rather naked.. :dance

dhgeyer
04-06-2010, 06:46 PM
Something a number of people found - a tankbag quiets things down. The two U shaped cutouts in the front of the tank for the fork legs apparently channel a lot of air up behind the shield. Without a tank bag, it appears this air causes more turbulence and noise. With a tank bag it seems greatly reduced. I suspect the same effect as the duct-tape block you made.

Since I always ride with a tank bag, can't say if this is true. Guess I could try taking mine off someday and going for a ride, but I'd feel rather naked.. :dance

I think you are pretty much right on this. I always ride with a tank bag also, but a rather small one. I like to be able to take it off when I go away from the bike.

The blocking prototypes I have come up with so far do what you say, partly. They block the tank cutouts, but also the space between the bars and the tank, about out to the handgrip/control assemblies, but angled outward so that more of the tank is covered. Since the tank cutouts are in front of this, this blocks them.

I did a 100 mile ride this morning, and tried one of my blocking setups with and without the spacer that angles the windshield backward. With the spacer in place, and the shield at about the same angle as the forks, I got more noise on top of my helmet, but no head shaking turbulence. With the spacer removed, and the windshield mount as stock, it was quieter, but there was a small amount of head turbulence.

I'm going to keep trying different setups.

dhgeyer
04-06-2010, 07:02 PM
In reading info on buffetting on other sites I see the addition of lowers on a lot of cruisers elimated the buffetting. It seems that they drive some air up behind the screen which neutralizes the negative pressure somewhat. Air doesn't like a vaccum so its going to try & fill it. Thats what I'm trying to create & it sounds like you are doing the same.

I had a 2002 Vulcan 1500 Classic FI for about 3 years. I put a big Memphis Shades windshield on it, and got buffeting. There was a guy on VROC (think this forum but for Vulcans) that had a cottage industry of making lowers to cut this down. I bought a set, but thought they weren't big enough. I got some Lexan I think it was, and made a really big set of lowers. That quieted things down pretty much completely, but not for the reason you suggest. In fact, just the opposite. The lowers channel the air out and away from the bike so that it doesn't come up behind the windshield.

The trick is to let just enough air behind the shield, like with a vent or vent holes, to minimize top turbulence caused by too much pressure imbalance, and keep the rest going around the bike and rider. A lot of the time the worst of the turbulence is in fact the air coming up behind the windshield, not over it and back.

I'm talking only about rather large windshields here, where the intent is to get the air, noise, and bugs up over your head. A different set of rules applies to the other valid approach, which is a much shorter shield that puts the turbulence at shoulder or neck height, and your head in full flow but undisturbed air. Either approach will work, but if you can get a big shield to work well the ride gets a lot quieter, and you don't have to clean the bugs off your face shield all the time.

I'd love to try putting a big set of lowers on the R12R, but this would interfere with those airflow directors that put air through the oil cooler. Bad idea.

Trickster
04-06-2010, 10:02 PM
I read all this fairing and windshield modification stuff, and can't help but think there is a BMW aerodynamics engineer someplace reading this, and going nuts.:D

"Adolph come see this forum and read what these crazy owners are doing to our bikes, we spent countless hours and thousands of deutchmarks designing these in the wind tunnel, and for what?":laugh

dhgeyer
04-06-2010, 11:01 PM
I read all this fairing and windshield modification stuff, and can't help but think there is a BMW aerodynamics engineer someplace reading this, and going nuts.:D

"Adolph come see this forum and read what these crazy owners are doing to our bikes, we spent countless hours and thousands of deutchmarks designing these in the wind tunnel, and for what?":laugh

Oh yes! I'm sure BMW spends huge amounts of time and money on careful research and development, and road and wind tunnel testing, in an all out effort to ensure the total comfort of everyone who rides their motorcycles with their genuine BMW windshields and mounts. Just like they do their seats. :laugh

ka5ysy
04-07-2010, 01:51 AM
Oh yes! I'm sure BMW spends huge amounts of time and money on careful research and development, and road and wind tunnel testing, in an all out effort to ensure the total comfort of everyone who rides their motorcycles with their genuine BMW windshields and mounts. Just like they do their seats. :laugh


Actually there is a team of space aliens that are used for seat design. Obviously they are not human anatomy of any kind.

cycleman2
04-07-2010, 02:47 AM
I was out today for a 100 mile ride and tried the adapter I'd built for picking up air above the headlight to help relieve the pressure behind the screen, helped some but didn't make a lot of difference. It did appear to reduce the buffetting but it was still noisy. It did move the top of the screen towards me and down slightly which caused the helmet to be in more clean air but still noiser than if running without a screen.

I kept feeling around the windshield and tank area with my free hand and the two main areas where the wind is coming from are:
1. around the upper portion of the screen where it narrows;
2. from the fronts of the gas tank.

The majority of air was coming from the gas tank itself. The way its shaped channels any air hitting the front of the tank upwards. It however doesn't seem to reach the helmet. I can see where some tank bags might reduce this upward volume of air.

I've removed the adapter and tried shimming the upper mounts with a couple of washers to get a slightly more upright profile on the screen. In my case the stock screen is too low. This should help but we'll see. There's also no reason the mounting brackets couldn't be bent slightly to change the profile of the screen.

henzilla
04-07-2010, 06:46 PM
There's also no reason the mounting brackets couldn't be bent slightly to change the profile of the screen.



The stock brackets are prone to breaking in regular use where they bolt to the fork/instrument cluster...we keep spares for ours and friends with 1100R's.
I wouldn't even breathe on them, much less try to bend them. Your results may differ. It would seem standing the screen up almost flat to the wind is adding strain to the brackets and any aero advantage of the original design. It's not a Harley:laugh

cycleman2
04-07-2010, 11:35 PM
Your right its not a Harley. They are aluminium so you certainly have to be carefull how much you try & bend them cold.

If they broke I'd just make them out of steel. I have a laminar lip coming for the screen and also have a bigger after market screen so I'm sure something will work.

We get a lot of wind & cold up in this part of the world and a screen of some sort is almost a must if you are going to travel any distance.

henzilla
04-08-2010, 02:01 AM
I believe the stockers are steel...looks like they took tubing and flattened it at ends for the mounting holes. That seems to be the weak link on all the sets that have broken.
Anyways, I understand the need for some wind protection...and I used to ride H-D's so I was not being snobby...just never went as fast or for so long on my H-D's:laugh But they sure caught some wind!

ANDYVH
04-09-2010, 04:00 PM
I have three windshields for my 94 R1100RS. A Parabellum with an adjustable wing-lip at the top. A trimmed down Luftmiester, about 1/2 the height of the Parabellum. And I have the stock windshield which I trimmed down to just be a cover over the gauges. In the heat of summer, I sometimes ride with the very low shield because I kind of like the "naked" feel it gives the bike.

But, earplugs are absolutely required then. And here in Wisconsin, the summer bugs are brutal on my jacket and faceshield. So I eventually revert back to my taller windshield.

But I think the R1200R is a very desireable bike, more the classic BMW in my mind. I could see getting one as my next bike, and then customize the old RS fairing from the 80's to fit it.

dougfollett
04-09-2010, 04:26 PM
Boy, there's one good reason for having a fairing, BUGS! I have been hit by bugs and thought someone was throwing rocks at me. I can't imagine riding an unfaired bike without a helmet and full face shield. THWACK!!!

dhgeyer
04-09-2010, 04:50 PM
Earlier in this thread there was some discussion of ways to stop the helmet buffeting with taller windshields on the roadsters. I have come up with a what I am pretty sure will be my final design that works very well with the Cee Bailey 24.75" shield I have (cut down from 26"), and the R1200R. The material is rubber from a motorcycle inner tube. Shown is the left deflector. The right one is a mirror image.

http://www.gallery1700.net/linkto/deflector.jpg

This is the shape I cut out. This is actually a failed attempt. The one I used is a bit higher. The correct height on the left (long) side is 13.5", and the width, at its widest point is 7.75"

http://www.gallery1700.net/linkto/dback.jpg

This is the left side mounted. The orientation of the piece is the same as in the first image. The top is mounted with tape to the handlebar as you can see. I may get ambitious and find a better way with some clamps, but this works. The bottom is slid under the plastic thing that screws to the front of the tank cutout on either side.

http://www.gallery1700.net/linkto/dfront.jpg

This shows the lower mounting from the front. The rubber deflector is long enough so that the screw in the upper middle of the photo goes through it, holding it quite securely, but short enough to avoid blocking the vents. Apart from that, I applied double sided foam "picture hanging" tape in half inch strips in places between the plastic piece and the rubber along the periphery. In order to do this mounting I had to also take out the screw holding the plastic thing at the bottom. Note that the rubber goes right to the front of the inverted horn projection at the very front of the tank. Now that I think of it, I had to cut the rubber around the vent while I was mounting, so the first image isn't quite accurate.

The left mounting was done with the handlebars at full lock right, and vice-versa.

It doesn't look too horrible, doesn't interfere with movement of the bars, and has totally eliminated helmet buffeting.

The R1100R has a different setup, so this general approach might work, but the specifics would be different. I don't know about the R1150R.

AndresS
04-12-2010, 08:31 AM
Rode about a hundred miles yesterday on the back roads between the Nurburgring and Frankfurt airport. It had dawned with a hard frost. As the scooter has no heated grips, my gloves, the barrier gloves and the rain over gloves I wore were not up to the task , on a K100 LT mind you, that sort of fairs your hands with the mirrors. THAT is where I need fairings :blah Thought I was gonna lose mah handies for a moment there. Stopped by the side of the road (not much open in the Fatherland at the crack of dawn on Sundays) and thawed them on the engine! My cut down fairing still impresses me!!
Cheers
Andres
:burnout

dougfollett
04-12-2010, 02:25 PM
I still miss my old 1986 R90RT, my first BMW, a fully fared bike. Shortly after I purchased it I was coming home from a friends home where I had stayed longer than I had intended and it was getting dark and cold. I was bracing myself for the cold ride home but was pleasantly surprised to find that the cold air was almost completely directed away from my body and as the cylinders warmed up, things even got sort of cozy.

dhgeyer
04-12-2010, 05:19 PM
Rode about a hundred miles yesterday on the back roads between the Nurburgring and Frankfurt airport. It had dawned with a hard frost. As the scooter has no heated grips, my gloves, the barrier gloves and the rain over gloves I wore were not up to the task , on a K100 LT mind you, that sort of fairs your hands with the mirrors. THAT is where I need fairings :blah Thought I was gonna lose mah handies for a moment there. Stopped by the side of the road (not much open in the Fatherland at the crack of dawn on Sundays) and thawed them on the engine! My cut down fairing still impresses me!!
Cheers
Andres
:burnout

I don't have a fairing, but I do have heated grips and Gerbings heated gloves. With both, I have ridden down to 23 degrees Fahrenheit with no discomfort. No handguards even. The really good part is, when it's 90 I can wear mesh gloves and stay cool.

boxerkuh
04-12-2010, 07:03 PM
And for the same reason I own 2 bikes, one with a full RS fairing and one without an R. I ride both all year round, but prefer the RS in nasty weather as it gives more protection. Interestingly enough, I have a harder time staying within the speed limit with the RS than the R. I am putting that up to wind... :dance

TNOutback
04-13-2010, 12:49 PM
I own an R1150R and currently have a 22 inch dome top Cee Bailey on it. The wind noise and turbulence is terrible; I may go back to the OEM sport shield. I have read with interest the posts about blocking the wind coming up from under the handlebars. Has anyone tried the Aeroflow Tank Wings? http://www.aeroflowscreens.com/images/R1150R/Tank%20Wings/1.jpg Those would seem to accomplish the same thing.

By the way, I do love my RR. :dance

dhgeyer
04-13-2010, 01:05 PM
And for the same reason I own 2 bikes, one with a full RS fairing and one without an R. I ride both all year round, but prefer the RS in nasty weather as it gives more protection. Interestingly enough, I have a harder time staying within the speed limit with the RS than the R. I am putting that up to wind... :dance

Well, you see, you've proven my point exactly. With all the stuff you can get for the R12R, and the different ways it can be configured, you would need at least two bikes to match its capabilities. I can go from a light, fun, nearly naked dayride bike to very competent touring machine in about 5 minutes, with all kinds of mix and match configurations in between.

Nothing wrong with owning multiple bikes, as long as you are willing to maintain, insure, and have room for them. Probably more fun, but certainly not as efficient.

cycleman2
04-13-2010, 01:39 PM
I've currently got a larger screen on my r1100r that cuts buffetting to zero and very little air on the helmet. I've only tried it for a short time on this bike. A few years ago I had it on my 77 Goldwing and it worked about the same as the Vetter fairing I eventually put on the bike.

The one I have is made up in Canada, usually sells for around $ 150. or so, but I've seen similar ones on ebay in the US. This link shows a similar screen : http://cgi.ebay.ca/BMW-R65-PLEXIFAIRING-3-Fairing-Windshield-Big_W0QQitemZ250610812139QQcmdZViewItemQQptZMotorc ycles_Parts_Accessories?hash=item3a599184eb

The one shown in the link is not exactly the same as mine but the overall shape is the same. Mine is a little shorter at the bottom and doesn't go down the forks as far. As for mounting on a R1100R series handlebars the top holes of the screen need to be enlarged to fit the stock BMW screen handlebar mounts and then the mid mounts have to be fabricated out of some light steel flat about 1/2" wide or so. You have to fiddle around a little bit, use the stock lower mount bolt and bend the new mounts so that they line up to a point on the lower screen and then mark the screen and drill the holes. Know ahead what size bolt/screw you are going to use. Use rubber grommet or washers. My screen just had two attachment points. The upper attachment holes and there was another at the very bottom of the screen that was designed to attach to the fork tubes. With the addition of the second attachment point it gives you a three point mount and it is very stable. My screen doesn't interfer with airflow to the oil coolers.

In my view the reason it gets rid of the buffetting is because of the portion that goes down behind the signal lights. The downside, there's always one. Around the city and at lower speeds the screen reflects back the engine/drivetrain noise. This noise is not there at speed. Another option if somebody wants to go there.

dhgeyer
04-13-2010, 02:45 PM
I own an R1150R and currently have a 22 inch dome top Cee Bailey on it. The wind noise and turbulence is terrible; I may go back to the OEM sport shield. I have read with interest the posts about blocking the wind coming up from under the handlebars. Has anyone tried the Aeroflow Tank Wings? http://www.aeroflowscreens.com/images/R1150R/Tank%20Wings/1.jpg Those would seem to accomplish the same thing.

By the way, I do love my RR. :dance

I don't know if that would work or not. Know what I'd do? Get some cardboard and duct tape and put something on each side that approximates what those tank wings do. Looks not to be too complicated. If it worked, I'd buy the tank wings. Just an idea......

osbornk
04-13-2010, 07:31 PM
I've currently got a larger screen on my r1100r that cuts buffetting to zero and very little air on the helmet. I've only tried it for a short time on this bike. A few years ago I had it on my 77 Goldwing and it worked about the same as the Vetter fairing I eventually put on the bike.

The one I have is made up in Canada, usually sells for around $ 150. or so, but I've seen similar ones on ebay in the US. This link shows a similar screen : http://cgi.ebay.ca/BMW-R65-PLEXIFAIRING-3-Fairing-Windshield-Big_W0QQitemZ250610812139QQcmdZViewItemQQptZMotorc ycles_Parts_Accessories?hash=item3a599184eb

The one shown in the link is not exactly the same as mine but the overall shape is the same. Mine is a little shorter at the bottom and doesn't go down the forks as far. As for mounting on a R1100R series handlebars the top holes of the screen need to be enlarged to fit the stock BMW screen handlebar mounts and then the mid mounts have to be fabricated out of some light steel flat about 1/2" wide or so. You have to fiddle around a little bit, use the stock lower mount bolt and bend the new mounts so that they line up to a point on the lower screen and then mark the screen and drill the holes. Know ahead what size bolt/screw you are going to use. Use rubber grommet or washers. My screen just had two attachment points. The upper attachment holes and there was another at the very bottom of the screen that was designed to attach to the fork tubes. With the addition of the second attachment point it gives you a three point mount and it is very stable. My screen doesn't interfer with airflow to the oil coolers.

In my view the reason it gets rid of the buffetting is because of the portion that goes down behind the signal lights. The downside, there's always one. Around the city and at lower speeds the screen reflects back the engine/drivetrain noise. This noise is not there at speed. Another option if somebody wants to go there.

I had a very similar Plexafairing 3 on a Honda Magna for several years and it worked the best of anything I have had short of a full fairing. I would recommend it. It was very stable at high speeds and provided good protection.

OfficerImpersonator
04-13-2010, 07:41 PM
I wouldn't commute year-round in Seattle without a fully-faired bike. I also wouldn't do it without ABS brakes, handlebar mitts, and an Aerostich suit (or equivalent).

The full fairing (with over-sized Aeroflow screen) on my RT keeps me warm AND dry. Add in the handlebar mitts (http://www.bestrestproducts.com/c-151-watershed-motormitts.aspx) plus heated grips and my hands are NEVER cold and wet.

Add a bunch of extra lights for conspicuity and I can comfortably ride in any weather as long as there isn't ice or snow on the pavement without the need for heated clothing.

535IS
04-21-2010, 09:56 PM
This link shows a similar screen : http://cgi.ebay.ca/BMW-R65-PLEXIFAIRING-3-Fairing-Windshield-Big_W0QQitemZ250610812139QQcmdZViewItemQQptZMotorc ycles_Parts_Accessories?hash=item3a599184eb

The one shown in the link is not exactly the same as mine but the overall shape is the same. Mine is a little shorter at the bottom and doesn't go down the forks as far.

In my view the reason it gets rid of the buffetting is because of the portion that goes down behind the signal lights. The downside, there's always one. Around the city and at lower speeds the screen reflects back the engine/drivetrain noise. This noise is not there at speed. Another option if somebody wants to go there.
You have the Plexifairing 2, as shown here:

http://www.nationalcycle.com/catalogue/imagesProducts/PFGT-N8101_600.jpg

It is a universal fit screen you can get to work on almost any bike. I had it on a Honda Shadow (sometimes; it takes about a minute to remove and maybe three to reinstall, depending on your mood) and it's now on a friend's Yamaha Virago. It does a great job at calming the air around you, but it's like pushing a barn door through the air.

More recently, I had a Shadow with a little 'tombstone' mini shield. It didn't do anything to keep you warm or dry (nothing for your hands, etc.), but it was perfect for diverting all the bugs just over my head and keeping things quiet. In fact, it was a lot quieter with an open face helmet than my R100RS with a full face helmet. Yes; the RS keeps me dry and I can actually ride it down to about freezing with proper clothes (Electrical heaters? On a stock AIRHEAD? Yeah; right.) but the helmet buffeting is downright ridiculous.

cycleman2
04-21-2010, 11:37 PM
I installed the Laminar Lip on my stock windshield & it does cut down on the buffetting. Noise is a little less but still noisier than the bigger screen.

To be fair to the Laminar I do have to move the upper stock shield mounts out about 1/2 or 3/4 of an inch as I put a set of handlebar adapters that move the handlebars back that far which affected the upper mounting brackets. That no doubt will make a difference as the screen is angled a little further back the way it now is.

I did put some small wings that pick up wind between the signal lights & lower portion of the windshield. They direct air up behind the shield to help ease the negative pressure behind the windshield.

carockwell
04-22-2010, 01:59 AM
Don't the big Plexifairings make the bike unstable in cross winds?

cycleman2
04-22-2010, 03:27 AM
It' been my experience that there's not a lot of difference between the two sizes of windshields. As with any screen the wind direction has the biggest effect on the bike.

Last weekend I travelled about 500 miles with the big screen, passing trucks etc at speeds up to 80 mph and today I only went about 60 miles and I had the stock windshield with Laminar Lip on the bike. I'd have to rate them about the same as far as affecting handling.

Tonight I moved the top mounts out about 1/2" to compensate for the handlebars being moved back. If I get a chance I'll try it again tomorrow and see how it works with the stock screen set up.

osbornk
04-23-2010, 12:49 AM
Don't the big Plexifairings make the bike unstable in cross winds?2

It didn't seem to bother my Magna. There is not much to catch the wind on the side. If I had another unfaired bike, I would get another Plexafairing 2.

cycleman2
04-23-2010, 03:10 AM
Moving the top mounts out about 1/2" made a difference. The stock shield with the Laminar Lip is a workable product. I didn't notice any buffetting but the bigger shield is still quieter.

My next project is messing around with a real old batwing fairing and see what happens.