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mikeb921
09-07-2009, 01:41 PM
I hear a lot of Airhead owners swear by the old technology and don't even want to try the "new" stuff. This argument has been around as long as I've been riding BMW's. I remember when the /2 die hards didn't want anything to do with the "new fangled" /5's. They weren't ready to give up their magnetos for the new battery and coil ignitions and the electric starters. Every generation of bikes has had it's share of "fear police" stating all the reasons to stay away from the unproven new models. Almost every new model had some bugs to work out but were better motorcycles in general to the bikes they replaced. I LOVE Airheads and want one for a hobby bike. But for real world riding, touring, and comuting give me the latest version of ABS, traction control, on board computers and every other form of BMW whiz bang technology they can add to two wheels if it in any way gives me a slight edge on risk management and maintaining my zone. Many things were simpler in the good ol days, but these ain't the good ol days.

Ride safe,
MB

cjack
09-07-2009, 02:09 PM
give me the latest version of ABS, traction control, on board computers and every other form of BMW whiz bang technology they can add to two wheels if it in any way gives me a slight edge on risk management and maintaining my zone. Many things were simpler in the good ol days, but these ain't the good ol days.

Ride safe,
MB

My thinking too. I love the new bikes...especially when they are running...heh. I guess the old BMWs I had were more likely to limp home when something broke. I bought a new '73 R75/5 once and had the input bearing go out in the trans in less than a thousand miles. I just rode it where I was headed and then home and then to the dealer for a new trans. Noisy, but got me there.
The new bikes seem to be more vulnerable to something breaking and not get you home.
Some of the fuel sensor strip problem reports are comical though. I have had four of them in my '08 K1200S and never run out of gas. One time I was thinking "hey...this can't be half full...I haven't ridden this bike that much since I filled up, but it should be down somewhat...". So I did something that I learned in the old days and looked inside the tank with a flashlight...saw nothing but hoses and wires and very little gas...so I headed for the first gas station.

YMMV...

47512
09-07-2009, 03:17 PM
Ihave a /2, a R75/6, (170,000 miles) and a R1200R, and 2 K100RS's that have passed through the shop. The R75/6 is the most relible motorcycle I have ever owned, and I still enjoy riding it, and yes road side repairs were much easyer but you can't argue with real brakes, forks and frames that don't flex.

I have a shop full of old motorcycles that I enjoy, but for any real milage I'll take a new one any time.

Ken G.

osbornk
09-07-2009, 03:27 PM
I think new technology is superior but I keep my airhead because of the direction BMW is going (as well as other manufacturers). To me, bigger is not necessarily better. I like a mid-sized touring bike but they are no longer made like they were several years ago. To me, a BMW is a boxer engine with shaft drive. Vertical engines with belt or chain drive is just another bike. I would love to have a modern version of my R80RT (size and feel). The K75RT I had was a nice bike but it didn't have the BMW feel. It did everything better than the R80RT but it didn't push my buttons. The F and G bikes are the right size but just don't do it for me.

I guess I'm a traditionalist who wants the newest technology.

Ken

JAMESDUNN
09-07-2009, 03:51 PM
I hear a lot of Airhead owners swear by the old technology and don't even want to try the "new" stuff. This argument has been around as long as I've been riding BMW's. I remember when the /2 die hards didn't want anything to do with the "new fangled" /5's. They weren't ready to give up their magnetos for the new battery and coil ignitions and the electric starters. Every generation of bikes has had it's share of "fear police" stating all the reasons to stay away from the unproven new models. Almost every new model had some bugs to work out but were better motorcycles in general to the bikes they replaced. I LOVE Airheads and want one for a hobby bike. But for real world riding, touring, and comuting give me the latest version of ABS, traction control, on board computers and every other form of BMW whiz bang technology they can add to two wheels if it in any way gives me a slight edge on risk management and maintaining my zone. Many things were simpler in the good ol days, but these ain't the good ol days.

Ride safe,
MB
If I suffer a failure of some sort on my old airhead, I can repair it and get it back on the road again. All mechanical, and no modern electronics (except the electric tach on my '78). In this way the old boxers are superior. By any other objective measurement the new technology wins. Subjectively? I love the airheads. Even the modern boxers (oilheads and hexheads) are missing the elusive "soul" of the airheads. Hobby bike? For some perhaps; my '78 sees serious mileage though, and I am just as likely to saddle up on the airhead as the more modern oiler. Depends on my mood, and perhaps to some extent the type of riding I am considering.The old boxer will take me down any road I wish to travel about as fast as any modern road burner, with perhaps a little more effort and a little less comfort, but never with more drama. I do like the power and handling of the new bikes, but even if I bought new, it'd be a boxer. Still easier to service than the latest K bikes and hence cheaper to own (screw type valves vs. shimmed for example). "Whiz bang" technology is fun and exciting, but ya do not wish it to crap out when in the middle of nowhere, or sometimes, even in the middle of somewhere! Real world riding? Depends on which real world you are riding in. Older and slower is maybe at times just the ticket, but maybe not all the times!

lkchris
09-07-2009, 06:47 PM
I love the new technology and keep up with it with cars.

As for my motorcycle, my old one will go faster than I can ride it, so a newer, faster one doesn't do much. ABS brakes and electronic stability programs on cars are must haves, but the contribution of such to motorcycle safety seems a bit less obvious. These systems certainly haven't reduced my responsibility for my own safety.

Besides, I've ridden Oilheads and found them boring because I like brake dive. Actually, I like actually using brakes, but seem to hardly need to use the Oilhead's better brakes as there's so much engine compression braking due to fuel injection cutoff.

Rock hard tires aren't very fun, either.

Most of all, the newer bikes are so compromised to carrying passengers that their seats are unusable by taller riders. Who wants to sit on the gap between the front and rear seat?

Back in '85 I rode the new K-bikes and haven't considered one for a nanosecond since. These supreme vibrators were basically unrideable, although I'm sure they've improved on them since. I'm a boxer twin fan in any event, but the throttle surge and the abrupt throttle cutoff of the Oilheads are not fun to live with, and really not necessary. Perhaps the later versions have improved on these major faults, too, but the seats are still two-piece, aren't they?

Technology is cool, but comfort is worth something as well. I'm not giving up the latter just to have the former. I know I'm not giving up any fun.

kbasa
09-07-2009, 07:14 PM
I like them all.

The new ones have strengths and the old ones have charms.

crazydrummerdude
09-07-2009, 08:07 PM
I was behind some brand new (Suzuki, not BMW) sport bikes on a hilly/twisty road the other day. I was on my 35 year old R75. Apart from initial acceleration on the 2 straightwaways, I kept right with them in the twisties. That's the fun part anyway. I could have passed them.

The difference between my old bike, and their new ones is the price for the initial acceleration. In a similar vein as lkchris, I can't justify it, as my bike(s) will also do more than I ever need/want of them.

One day, I may own a "newer" BMW.. but I won't sell my old ones to afford it.

mcmxcivrs
09-07-2009, 08:41 PM
At sixeen years old, my R1100RS is hardly new technology anymore. Its even older than a few airheads. Perhaps its true that the older simpler airheads could be repaired roadside when needed. In the 130,000 kms I've ridden my oilhead, I've never had to fix it roadside, so I can't really say if it could be done or not. :whistle

jforgo
09-08-2009, 03:38 PM
I like all bikes. If your bike does what you want it to do, and you hop off with a smile, then apparently you have done well.
For my part, I am not wealthy, and the non user servicability of a lot of the newer stuff requires me to marry the dealer. I cannot afford that, so I would end up riding less, or not at all.
So I deliberately went rtetro/low tech, so i can do my own work. So now I know what is going on/has been done with my bikes.
Also, my experience with professional mechanics, both directly, and what I have actually found on vehicles with service records, leaves me cold.
No insult to the good mechanics out there, but on average, based on what I have seen, the people who are paid to work on vehicles are not worth the $$$. They simply and obviously either are not competent, or cannot be trusted.

boxermaf
09-08-2009, 07:03 PM
I agree with some of the gang here - "new" is nice, and better brakes, charging, and lighting systems all improve safety. But, do I have any practical need for CANbus on a bike, other than antilock brakes and fuel management? ABS can be a big plus, I agree, though I've managed for over 30 years without it on any of my bikes so far. Fuel Injection is very nice for maintaining performance at changing altitudes. These technology improvements make sense to me - but wireless antitheft systems are just for the insurance company and more prone to causing me heartburn, IMHO. To me, it does seem that the bikes are becoming less and less "all-arounders" like many of the airheads are/were, and being more "niche" bikes. They seem to do things quite well in their part of the spectrum, but I am also becoming less happy about where the brand seems to be going with many of the larger/heavier machines. The F800 bikes seem a bit more like the earlier BMW philosophy in some ways, but that engine just isn't pretty in spite of how it can perform.

john1691
09-09-2009, 11:44 AM
My first BMW was a K1200RS, after owning a Kawi ZX6R Ninja, so when the opportunity came to "upgrade" it seemed natural to go to the newer K1200S. May not have been the best purchase, as the repairs are more expensive already. I've never owned an airhead, but would love to get a 1966 (my birth year) in whatever model I can find/afford. A buddy got his daughter a 1980 R65 and having ridden that, I can see the pull toward the older, simpler bikes. While I like just about any motorcycle, I enjoy the people I meet (mostly) on BMW's, and the benefits of this club. Sure, you meet the nicest people on a Honda, but it seems the most fun people are on a BMW!

I guess if you want a new airhead, Ural is making the 750 opposed twin................

I know, just not the same for some reason.

shire2000
09-09-2009, 02:40 PM
Actually, the Ural is not such a bad bike. It is definitely "old school" and has gone thru some major teething pains over the past 20 years. They have been drastically improved and have become quite reliable, especially in the past 5 years. I have a few friends that have them and really enjoy them. I think of them as a slightly modified /2 and /5 blended together. If I wanted a sidecar rig for puttering down secondary hiways, the Ural would get more than just a second look from me.

BUBBAZANETTI
09-09-2009, 03:07 PM
I like them all.

The new ones have strengths and the old ones have charms.

well said

i went for a ride Monday with my buddy on his rather newish Bonneville, granted, it's a bit of a throwback bike, but still modern. we'd never ridden together before and he was impressed letting me know "that thing goes pretty good".

the old bikes do more than you think they can, they might just not do it as effortlessly as the newer machines.

108625
09-09-2009, 10:36 PM
the old bikes do more than you think they can, they might just not do it as effortlessly as the newer machines.

The same might be said of some riders :laugh

I look at it this way:

I've had old beemers and new ones, and presently have old Hondas and new ones. Generally, what you can do with an old bike is a matter of the bike's limits. What you can do with a new bike is a matter of the rider's.

If I were to ride a beemer again, I would like to try out my limits on their new superbike on the track. However if I had to cross a wide open empty space on crummy roads, without the benefit of cell phone reception, "roadside service" or Ewan and Charley's support convoy, I'd do it on an R100GS with a tool kit.

Personally though; BMW won't get me back with any hot new model, or by reintroducing some variant of a classic airhead (pipe dream guys; give it up).
They really need to improve other things besides just their bikes.
What does it matter which brand it is, or if it's old or new?
All that matters is if we can say:bikes

Ken F
09-13-2009, 02:45 AM
I for one like the new technology. Just recently purchased a '95 R1100RS after riding Harleys for the last 43 years. To me it's a breath of fresh air!

Ken F

GlobalRider
09-13-2009, 03:23 AM
I hear a lot of Airhead owners swear by the old technology and don't even want to try the "new" stuff.

I have and the "new stuff" works great...right up to the moment till it doesn't work anymore. Then all you can do is stand around and wait.

knary
09-13-2009, 04:25 AM
well said

i went for a ride Monday with my buddy on his rather newish Bonneville, granted, it's a bit of a throwback bike, but still modern. we'd never ridden together before and he was impressed letting me know "that thing goes pretty good".

the old bikes do more than you think they can, they might just not do it as effortlessly as the newer machines.

What doesn't go "pretty good" compared to a new bonnie? :ha

R80RTJohnny
09-13-2009, 04:31 AM
Keep a variety in your garage and life is good.

Enjoy!

GlobalRider
09-13-2009, 12:31 PM
Keep a variety in your garage and life is good.

Enjoy!

Thats why I just added a Porsche Carrera to my garage as well....to add to the two airhead GSes and one oilhead GS. ;)

Once again, I decided to go "older" rather than "newer" simply because a 993 series is far better than a 996 series and better than a 997 series...IMO.

http://photos.smugmug.com/photos/647937450_cTiix-M-1.jpg

By the way, its low ultra low mileage, totally original and absolutely MINT. :dance

mikeb921
09-13-2009, 12:52 PM
Keep a variety in your garage and life is good.

Enjoy!

This sounds like the best plan.

Ride Safe
MB

184480
09-22-2009, 09:31 PM
Had a 1980 R100RT I rode for 19 years and it never made me walk once. Got a 2002 GS Adventure, almost 70,000 miles in 5 years. Almost no problems either. Wanted to downsize and sold the GS and bought a 1973 R75 /5.
The /5 was in rough shape but I was adamant about getting in good enough shape to tour on. Many hundreds of dollars later it became apparent to me that it never would be what I was expecting as far as reliability etc. One cold, damp, Saturday morning I went to start it to meet club folks for breakfast and I couldn't get it to start for anything. It went on Craigslist that same afternoon and was sold in a week.

I like old bikes but I hate working on stuff anymore and if you run an old bike that's what your doing about 30% of the time. They're old, that's the problem. The electrical connections are old and corroded, bearings are worn, just lots and lots of issues.

I like riding the latest technology. Most often its reliable, dependable and you spend most of your time in the saddle instead of kneeling next to a broken bike on the shoulder of a freeway.

lkchris
09-23-2009, 09:05 PM
Personally though; BMW won't get me back with any hot new model ...

Nor will BMW sell old, obsolete technology to today's first-time buyers.

108625
09-23-2009, 10:48 PM
Nor will BMW sell old, obsolete technology to today's first-time buyers.

Amen to that.

The only people claiming a new airhead (which was obsolete when they were building it) will sell, are people who already own airheads.
Who do they think will buy these bikes?
How much would they pay?

knary
09-24-2009, 12:32 AM
New Ural ST is expected to sell for around $8k.

shire2000
09-24-2009, 02:15 AM
I have said it before and know that many others feel and think the same way. I do not like the looks of the new BMWs. I am sorry, but I think the design of the seat forward to the forks, reminds me of a demented hog in heat. Also, I do not like all the "farkles" and I don't need all the added on gimickery. GPS, CB radio, AM/FM CD, MP3 player, 16 speaker sound with enormous sub woofer, 10,000 watt amplifiers, Anti-lock brakes, traction control, self adjusting this and that, electric windshield adjustment, heated seats, heated grips, defogger, air conditioning, air bags, windshield wipers, monster trunk, anti-tip over suspension (training wheels), 5 mph bumpers. Where will it all end? oh, just get kill me now.

Give me a basic, simple design that I can fix on the side of the road, if I need to. Not everyone can afford the new bikes at the current price points. Sorry, but I just cannot justify buying a bike in the $20,000 range or higher. Sure there are lots of people who can, and lots that will have a full stable of those types of bikes. But there are just as many who can afford only one bike and prefer something they can work on themselves if required.

A new version of the old design would be very welcome by many, especially at a reasonable price. I don't think it would be all that hard to make a real modern version of an Airhead. And make it look like an Airhead. The Hexhead is a nice bike, but the only thing it really has in common with an Airhead is that 2 cylinders stick out the sides and the roundels.

If I was to become serious about buying something new, I just might be looking at a Ural. Although I do like the new Moto-Guzzi. I just purchased an older Ural that I am going to upgrade with an R100 engine, make all my own wiring, upgrade the suspension to modern shocks and replace all bearings with new aftermarket ones. Once completed, that will be my "new" bike. Present estimate of the complete rebuild/refurbish is under $7,000, including the many boxes and bags of parts that are supposed to be a complete bike and the R100 engine that I rebuilt last winter. Can't buy anything new like it for anywhere near that price.

But then, I am just an old fogey. What the heck do I know?

cjack
09-24-2009, 02:37 AM
Ever look at the R1200R? Kind of like an airhead, but satisfies the clean air act.

shire2000
09-24-2009, 02:59 PM
Looked at the R1200R and sat on one. Did not like the look nor the seating position. Plus, it feels heavy as heck in comparison to my R100RT. If other manufacturers can make retro styled or even just updated old style bikes that pass EPA, then why can't BMW? Because they have chosen not to.

I also look at the so called evolution of BMW bikes and really feel that they have just finally figured out how to compete with the Japanese brands. It took them a little longer, but finally figured it out. With the new S1000 they are making a very competent and updated UJM. I fully expect that in a short period of time, almost all BMWs will be utilizing the same design.

For those that do not know the meaning of UJM, it is an old saying used back in the 70s and 80s for Universal Japanese Motorcycles. Basically all 4 cylinder Japanese bikes looked pretty much the same. Nothing wrong with that, but lots of people bought European and American designs, just to be different. They felt that the Japanese bikes had no soul.

darrylri
09-24-2009, 05:45 PM
Looked at the R1200R and sat on one. Did not like the look nor the seating position. Plus, it feels heavy as heck in comparison to my R100RT.

Don't know why that would be. An R1200R weighs 490 lbs. with a full tank, that's just a bit more than my R90S at 473 lbs., and certainly a lot less than your R100RT at 515 lbs. And the R doesn't have a big fairing held up high. (Kind of an apples vs. oranges comparison.)

108625
09-24-2009, 06:03 PM
"Soul"?

People can use whatever language they want to explain their choices, but "soul" is just another way of saying it all comes down to wanting to be different taking a higher priority than other criteria.
(Such as performance, design, comfort, reliability, or whatever else).

Put another way; if the classic UJM was always boxer powered and just as ubiquitous, and the less common BMW was always a transverse four and just as uncommon, the same crowd would be bestowing "soul" on the tranverse four BMW because it was different from all the boxer-powered UJMs.

mikeb921
09-24-2009, 07:48 PM
Looked at the R1200R and sat on one. Did not like the look nor the seating position. Plus, it feels heavy as heck in comparison to my R100RT. If other manufacturers can make retro styled or even just updated old style bikes that pass EPA, then why can't BMW? Because they have chosen not to.

Shire2000, You owe it to yourself to try the R1200R. Sitting on a bike is just not a good test to see if it's a bike you may enjoy. I think the looks of the 1200R are striking and trust me, it does EVERYTHING better than your R100RT. It's faster, lighter, handles better, better brakes, better mpg, and maintenance is equal to what you're used to (okay it has a couple more valves per side) but NO carbs to mess with. If you tried one for an afternoon of mixed riding they'd probably have to PRY you off of it. Speak poorly of it AFTER you've tried it. I'm not saying get rid of your airhead, just be open minded.

Ride Safe,
MB

knary
09-24-2009, 07:55 PM
"Soul"?

People can use whatever language they want to explain their choices, but "soul" is just another way of saying it all comes down to wanting to be different taking a higher priority than other criteria.
(Such as performance, design, comfort, reliability, or whatever else).

Put another way; if the classic UJM was always boxer powered and just as ubiquitous, and the less common BMW was always a transverse four and just as uncommon, the same crowd would be bestowing "soul" on the tranverse four BMW because it was different from all the boxer-powered UJMs.

:thumb

shire2000
09-24-2009, 10:17 PM
I think "soul" is very subjective. We will all have our own definition. Some of us may not be able to describe it in words, while others can go on about it forever. I think it has a lot to do with a combination of things. Looks, appeal, touch and feel, how you react to it, etc. Very hard to put a proper definition on it.

As to riding the R1200R, the next time I get to a BMW dealer that has one, I just might do that, if they let me. The closest dealer to me is not always keen on letting people do test rides. Heck, half the time I go in there they don't even really want to talk to me. I have to go and ask for assistance while the "sales representative" is getting another capucinno. Sometimes they can be a snooty bunch. Yet other times, they can be all charm and try to be as helpful as possible.

Now, I also have looked at the R1200RT as a replacement for my R100RT. That just does not cut it for me. Way too many bells and whistles. If the R1200R could have a fairing similar to the R100RT and get rid of that huge hump that is supposed to look like a gas tank, then maybe I might get more interested. Lots of people want all those bells and whistles, and that is great for them. Myself, I want it as simple as possible. Sure, on my old R100RT I have to adjust the carbs now and again, but have you ever tried to adjust your fuel injection? Most maintenance between the 2 is similar, but when it gets into computerized stuff, well, that is way beyond most of us. When we go touring, I seriously doubt that many of us would be dragging along a specialized laptop that can access the bikes computer system, along with the expensive software required to do it. But I can sure get a set of Bings working well enough to get home under some pretty adverse conditions. Not all of us ride where there are lots of BMW dealers around, even on supposed street bikes.

I am not saying that the new bikes are bad. I am just saying that for the type of riding I do, matched up with my mechanical skills, I prefer it to be as simple as possible.

darrylri
09-24-2009, 11:25 PM
Myself, I want it as simple as possible. Sure, on my old R100RT I have to adjust the carbs now and again, but have you ever tried to adjust your fuel injection?

It's pretty much the same as the carbs (but more sensitive). Do you have Carb Stix or a Twinmax? It's the same tool for fuel injection. Maybe add in a Digital Volt Meter if you're going to touch the TPS.


Most maintenance between the 2 is similar, but when it gets into computerized stuff, well, that is way beyond most of us. When we go touring, I seriously doubt that many of us would be dragging along a specialized laptop that can access the bikes computer system, along with the expensive software required to do it.

darrylri
09-24-2009, 11:48 PM
(Actually, I have to admit that I don't carry a GS-911 with me; don't even own one. I have a Twinmax, but I've only used it a few times because all of my bikes that can be serviced with it go to the local independent shop for routine service.

In about 185k miles of riding three different Airheads, I've been stranded twice; in almost 340k miles of riding three Oil/Hex heads, I've been stranded thrice. That's roughly a once in 100k miles experience.

In four the five cases above, if I'd had a full Snap-On tool chest and a Moditec computer along, it wouldn't have mattered, the bike couldn't be fixed by the side of the road. I'm talking about a dead diode board, a broken final drive, broken drive shaft, and a completely blown motor. All of these components had serious mileage on them before they let go, and they owed me little if anything. The motor, for example, had 180k miles on it, was never babied, and I was doing ~6,000rpm and 110mph on the Authobahn at the time it let go.

Frankly, I think this "easier to fix!"/"never breaks!" argument (less filling! tastes great!) is a bunch of hooey. You get a bike into good operating condition and you do the routine maintenance, and then it runs well for a long time. I just don't sweat these very occasional big problems. Any motorcycle is far more highly streesed than just about any car, so if I get car-like reliability out of my bikes, I'm very pleased.)

ALIENHITCHHIKER
09-25-2009, 01:57 AM
This, I really like (just might be my next one):

http://www.hanniganmotorcyclefairings.com/

R80RTJohnny
10-11-2009, 04:32 AM
I like them all.

The new ones have strengths and the old ones have charms.

Having ridden both an Airhead and Hexhead back to back today I can only agree with your post.

So well said!

GlobalRider
10-11-2009, 12:18 PM
The new ones have strengths...

...and weaknesses; and the old ones have advantages not found in the new ones.

31310
10-13-2009, 04:45 PM
I own older and newer bikes and each has merits so I offer this thought. For all who ask what to do when the new technology breaks and what then? How many of us drive vehicles with points ignition, heat our homes with wood/coal or use candles? Do we drive modern vehicles, heat with forced air furnaces, use light bulbs? My guess is very few in our modern societies use the former technolgies. We appear to accept newer things, even if I grumble about it at times and carry on. Hey, we would not be exchanging opinions were it not for computers.
I have been stranded with my '83RT (still own it) and somehow survived standing on the shoulder in the summer. I'm concerned with being stranded in winter which means my bikes are not a factor. I own an '07RT and there is no comparison (imho) between the two in terms of handling, braking, power and with help on this board, have done my own servicing too. If memory serves, think the weights on each bike are about the same. Should the '07 ever leave me on the side of the road, will make a call on my cell. Styling is a personal matter, few except for other beemer nuts have ever suggested the '83 is a good looking bike. However, non riders (& even Harley types) have said "that is a sharp looking bike" re the '07, even my mother in law likes it. I'm not taking a shot at airhead owners as one of my bikes is an airhead. I appreciate both bikes, recognize the strengths/weakness of each and consider myself very fortunate to own and ride them.

kz1000ken
10-26-2009, 05:25 PM
My R80RT is a darn fine machine.. I bought an R1100 RT because I wanted "the new stuff" but I just couldn't bring myself to give up on the Airhead. Its fun to ride, has that "old bike charm". From a practical perspective, the 80's luggage is the best, it fits a Full Face XL Helmet AND your sweater in one bag. I love the bike and ride it thousands of miles a year..

My Oilhead R1100RT is far and away my favorite bike of all time, out of all the bikes Ive ever owned.. I like it even more than the R1200RT I test rode, mainly because of the look and the seating position.

Anyway, the Airheads are just too cool, too much fun, and too easy to keep running to ever give up on.. The new stuff is great too...

so my reply is really one step closer to becoming "why you need multiple bikes" response..

mika
10-27-2009, 02:19 PM
Data panels, accessory and features lists included in a bikes description are objective. The experience of riding and or owning a bike is subjective. I currently have one bike because that is all my wallet will allow. I have ridden and own many different bikes over the years. Used for the right purpose on a given day each has been the best bike I have ever ridden for some reason. At another time each has been the spawn of satanÔÇÖs design board. In the end old or new, high or low tech ÔÇô I like bikes.

Hey Scott, spending time at the Ural dealer now?