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banjomack
05-18-2009, 05:31 PM
I'm a proud new owner of a 2005 R1200RT with 20k miles. I took ownership from a fellow in Duluth, GA and rode it back to Charlotte, NC (about 230 miles) in heavy rain. I noticed that at highway speeds it was a dream machine, but when I stopped at a gas stations my slow speed turns were "wider" than they should be. I have only ridden Harleys before this bike which have a low center of gravity. I realize this bike is a little top heavy and it will take some time to get used to it, but are there any pointers for a new rider to help me acclimate to this bike? Thanks!

SPOKESMAN
05-18-2009, 05:44 PM
For tight, low speed turns, weight the outside peg, turn your head and look at where you want to go. Slip the clutch and drag the rear brake, if necessary.

Seat height makes it tougher than on lower bikes, because you don't have the safety net of feet already virtually on the ground if something goes wrong, but my RT is capable of doing a pretty tight turn, even if I'm not.

RTST
05-18-2009, 05:47 PM
Went through the same feelings after getting off a Road King. The feelings don't go away you just kinda get use to it after a while. After riding the RT for a few months I climbed back on a Road King and wondered how I ever got it stopped when I owned one. Once you get used to the RT you will love the handling, braking and overall comfort.
Enjoy and ride safe!
Larry

hlothery
05-18-2009, 08:00 PM
. After riding the RT for a few months I climbed back on a Road King and wondered how I ever got it stopped when I owned one. Once you get used to the RT you will love the handling, braking and overall comfort.
Enjoy and ride safe!
Larry

Had those exact same feelings. RT is the finest road bike I have ever ridden. Congratulations on your new purchase, especially with such low mileage.:D

LONERANGER
05-18-2009, 08:32 PM
Went through the same feelings after getting off a Road King. The feelings don't go away you just kinda get use to it after a while. After riding the RT for a few months I climbed back on a Road King and wondered how I ever got it stopped when I owned one. Once you get used to the RT you will love the handling, braking and overall comfort.
Enjoy and ride safe!
Larry

I agree with Larry only I had a 06 Goldwing. I put 6500 miles on the leadwing and sold it. You will get used to the RT. Congrats on your purchase - the more you ride it more you will like it.

RSPENNACHIO
05-18-2009, 08:48 PM
I agree with everthing said so far.

I occasionally ride to the local comunity college or bike dealer and use their parking lot for practice. Both of them have the lines painted for the MSF classes. I think the best thing to practice is what they call "turn in the box" (I think?) I call it the figure 8.

If you don't have one near by then just start doing U-turns and try to stay with in 4 parking spaces. Once you get warmed up then go for 2 U-turns with in 4 spaces or.... a figure 8.


I call this working on my short game. By the way if you put your feet down then you have to exit and start over. I can do 2 U-turn in four spaces and so can the MSF instructor (He was riding a full dresser Harley).

PlaneGeek
05-18-2009, 10:08 PM
For tight, low speed turns, weight the outside peg, turn your head and look at where you want to go. Slip the clutch and drag the rear brake, if necessary.

Seat height makes it tougher than on lower bikes, because you don't have the safety net of feet already virtually on the ground if something goes wrong, but my RT is capable of doing a pretty tight turn, even if I'm not.

With a bit of practice you will soon be turning tight like this guy (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WhN2Xc0MiFM). BTW. Notice how far he has his head turned, that was really important for me when I started riding this beauty. :D

banjomack
05-18-2009, 10:21 PM
Thank you all for the kind words of wisdom and encouragement. I watched the video of the motorcycle cop in a maneuvering competition. WOW. I don't think I could ever do that. But, at this point I'm sure I will be able to master the slower turns and parking lot maneuvering. I know it's a matter of just getting some miles down. I love the bike! Just want to feel comfortable and "one" with the bike. It doesn't happen overnight I know.

glurkus
05-19-2009, 12:06 AM
I went from a R1100RT to a 1200RT and actually found the 1200 to be much more nimble than the 1100. I rode a Road King once years ago and almost dumped it doing a slow u turn in a parking lot.

akbeemer
05-19-2009, 12:45 AM
Something that I had to work on with the RT is keeping the speed up in low speed maneuvers. Too slow and you are manhandling not riding the bike. Try adding just a touch of speed to your low speed turns.

JT_R1200RT
05-19-2009, 02:19 AM
First gear just seems so tall for low speed maneuvers, I need to work on this. Thanks for the video post.

JT

CarolinaRT
05-19-2009, 05:46 PM
In the DOT parking lot, they required manuevers that would be challenging on a minibike. I passed even though I had the RT only a couple weeks but I feel your pain. It's a big bike that hates parking lots, but you'll get better at handling her. Spend time, just some, with various slow speed manuevers. It will really help your confidence.

CarolinaRT
05-19-2009, 05:49 PM
Watch this. The bike is very capable.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=UuaqeTL0kuc

Tbdomenz
05-19-2009, 06:56 PM
check out a LEO "Jerry Paladino"? somethin like that.
He's in the SE, GA, SC, NC
He has a slow ride DVD that is really very good.
I loaned mine out and it disappeared :cry

andrewsi
05-19-2009, 07:14 PM
Yeah, that one's called "Ride Like the Pros" and can probably be bought online from multiple sources.

STAN
05-20-2009, 06:00 PM
I too have an '05 RT. I loved the youtube video and actually learned from it. Did you notice how aggressive he was? He was not riding that bike, he was DRIVING it. At no point did the bike control him; he controlled it. Racers operate a bike like it is a tool designed to take them someplace quicker than the next guy. This policeman operated the bike like it was a tool designed to take him anywhere he wanted to go.

Tbdomenz
05-20-2009, 06:33 PM
I would like to see the Tuttles run that course on one of their choppers :nyah

EA0422
05-31-2009, 05:32 AM
look where you want to go and apply throttle, manipulate with clutch and brake and you can almost turn inside the space of its own wheel base. Thats how you get the best parking spots

professor
05-31-2009, 10:20 AM
I felt the same way when I got my '07 RT. It took about 3,000 miles to start feeling more comfortable with slow turns.

I recently rode a Yamaha 1700 that a friend is thinking about buying. I told him I thought the brakes are bad, but maybe not - maybe it's just that the RT is so much better. The experience made me very happy that I had chosen the RT.

LongWays
05-31-2009, 03:06 PM
Did my MSF RiderCoach Instructor Prep on a 1200RT that I'd only had for a few months and not a lot of miles. Initially I would have preferred to have done the course on my 1100GS, but its road legality was in debate :evil, so the RT it was and made it through with out issue - and came away with a lot more appreciation for what the bike can do :thumb