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View Full Version : wheel rotates when in gear - eng off



nevada72
05-03-2009, 01:16 AM
Did a search but too many final drive failures to sift thru to answer my question. :D

Here's the question - when my GS is on it's centerstand, not running, and in gear, should the rear wheel be able to rotate at all? I'm getting probably about 5 degrees of rotation. I checked after hearing a bit of a "clunk" upon light acceleration/deceleration. I was on and off the throttle in 1st gear at low speed. My progress was intentionally jerky as I was trying to jostle around the Jesse bags to see if they were loose.

The bike is new to me and has 45k miles. I've been going over the bike very carefully and it's in great shape and well maintained. It recently had a service at a BMW shop in Omaha. The p.o. asked them if it would need anything in the near future after they gave it a pretty thorough go over including FD fluid change. Their reply - "Maybe a final drive overhaul at 90k miles, but for now everything is good.". So it was given a clean bill of health, but still I have to wonder.

TIA

roborider
05-03-2009, 01:31 AM
The wheel will rotate about 1.5 inches in the situation you describe. That's normal lash. Don't know about the clunk though.

Robo

deilenberger
05-03-2009, 02:37 AM
Normal. The clunk is taking up all the slack in the gears in the rear drive and the transmission.

It's a non issue.. ride on with a happy and content mind. :bikes

nevada72
05-03-2009, 02:49 AM
That's a relief. Thanks guys!:D

roborider
05-03-2009, 01:11 PM
My 05 RT doesn't 'clunk', but I could see it described as that. First gear is windy, and opening and closing the throttle will jerk you around a bit, especially on fuel injected vs. carbureted bikes. I tend to lug and feather clutch second in a parking lot more than just use 1st gear with the clutch fully engaged: that's jerky and hard to control. Dragging the rear brake a bit can dampen this effect. Mostly, getting used to the bike, being easy on the throttle in 1st gear, and feathering the clutch will take care of the issue. Once you get moving and riding, you won't notice it, especially if you are riding smoothly and correctly.

nevada72
05-03-2009, 01:57 PM
... getting used to the bike, being easy on the throttle in 1st gear, and feathering the clutch will take care of the issue. Once you get moving and riding, you won't notice it, especially if you are riding smoothly and correctly.


It ony happened when I did it intentionally (on and off the throttle repeatedly in 1st gear) to find noises. Other than that I am a smooth rider. :D

roborider
05-04-2009, 01:01 AM
Oh yeah, I didn't mean to impugn your skills. It was more a general reply to anyone reading.