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bmw4life
03-30-2009, 02:21 AM
Hi,
I am getting ready to go on a long trip during easter break, and found out this morning my front and rear brake pads need to be replaced. My bike has 14,000 miles and the rear is worn out more than the frt.
I would like to replace the brake pads on my own. I have not done this on the R1200rt. Can someone guide me (with pic, if possible) how to replace the pads.
Is it pretty straight forward? Do I need to remove the frt and rear calipers?
Any help would be appreciated.

henzilla
03-30-2009, 03:28 AM
If you have ever changed disc pads in any vehicle, not hard at all. Brakes are your lifeline...if any doubt, get some experienced help!!! That said...

I do find it odd the fronts are anywhere near needing replacement at 14K. the rears I can believe since my '05 were gone at 16K when I bought it. Look in your manual to see the wear marker locations just to be sure if you have not. Some folks have original pads at over 20K...My '05 RT seems to use up rears, My '05GS didn't and my '09 does not either.

The Rear:

Loosen the two Torx bolts, the install torque will be 24Nm, but do not remove them yet

http://henzilla.smugmug.com/photos/501588506_fyiT3-M-1.jpg

remove the locking pin (1) and take a punch smaller than the bore to knock the long pin out towards the wheel (2) Now remove the two Torx bolts

wiggle the caliper pressing against the rotor to widen the spread of the pads . If you have never added fluid you are prob OK...if you have topped off the master cylinder resevoir, you need to draw some off or it will overfill the cup/and will not allow you to spread calipers enough.


http://henzilla.smugmug.com/photos/501588547_e9hPH-M.jpg

lift the caliper off the disc ,holding the pads in where you removed the pin

Note this flat spring...you may need to reset it in place before putting new pads in. the arrow faces direction of travel

http://henzilla.smugmug.com/photos/501588517_8rcNc-M.jpg

note orientation of pads and set new ones in place, there is a slot you need to be sure the leading edges fit in before you put the long pin back, replace pin by tapping it in (remember to orientate pin so you can put the lock clip in) and replace lock clip when you can see the small hole

reinstall caliper , you may have to widen spread a little, use a dull flat object and don't gouge the pads!

Install and torque the two Torx bolts, start bike and apply rear brakes to refill pistons.
New brakes do need some heat cycles to bed in... don't expect them to work 100% for a few stops . Also clean rotor with brake cleaner while you have the caliper off.

indycar
03-30-2009, 01:57 PM
Nice write up, thanks.

lensuz
03-30-2009, 02:46 PM
Also a good time to check disk wear. Minimums (material thickness):thumb : Front 4mm, Rear 4.5mm.

henzilla
03-30-2009, 07:26 PM
THe front pads can be changed with calipers in place.:thumb

Remove retainer (2).
Remove screw (3).

Remove spring (1). notice the arrow again...goes in direction of wheel travel

Remove the brake pads

http://henzilla.smugmug.com/photos/502106786_PS7aL-M.jpg

BMW makes snazzy tools, once again you can use a dull flat tool such as a small tire iron to push pads apart.

http://henzilla.smugmug.com/photos/502106823_CHtv5-M.jpg

Also, same as on the rear, if you added fluid to resevoir, you will have to drain some off before doing this...good time to check anyways . Put a good absorbent rag between handlebar resevoir and painted parts!

Remove the brake pads and carefully set aside to match up new ones


Set new pads out and verify orientation as you removed old ones

Grease the rear and the trailing end face of the backing plate. An anti-seize paste is used here, I use permatex copper. Take care to grease only the rear and the trailing end face of the backing plate. Greasing the backing plate can allow grease to make its way onto the friction pad and the brake disc. A little grease goes a long way!:whistle

Install pads and reverse order of assembly using the first numbered picture:

Install spring (1) with the arrow pointing in the forward direction of travel.

Install screw (3). 7 Nm is the torque value...very small torque value so don't strip the dang screw!!

Install retainer (2).

Repeat process for second set...having fun yet?

Once the brake pads have been changed, clean both rotors with brake cleaner...

with the ignition switched on, seat the new pads against the brake discs and check operation of the brake system.

Top off resevoir and remember the heat cycle and the bedding in of the new pads.

wrenchbender
03-31-2009, 02:26 AM
When you try to push the pistons back into the calipers you shouldn't push the old fluid back to the reservoir. First put a small hose on brake bleeder. Second have partner move brake lever enough to cover the return port in the master cylinder, (very small amount of lever movement). Third crack bleeder and now move the piston. This will keep the ****ty fluid from going through your ABS and then your master cylinder.

Old car trick.

bmw4life
03-31-2009, 09:35 AM
Thank you for the feedback.
Gret write up. I just rechecked my pads for both the frt and rear. I believe I have enough pad life for about 5 to 6 thousand miles. I will replace my pad when I get back from my trip.

henzilla
04-08-2009, 02:32 AM
Just a note that the Roadsters front brakes are a bit diff than the RT and the GS's

I just did a service to the Mileage Contest winners '07 R12R...happens to be my new bro-in-law Chuck Wetzel...

Anyways the spring retainer is different as this picture shows. I had the calipers off to install a new front tire , but you can do this with them installed like the RT/GS version in my previous write up.

http://henzilla.smugmug.com/photos/507838718_LWWNL-M.jpg

You remove the two set screws holding the retainer in place which exposes the center pin and the retaining clip on the right side in this picture

http://henzilla.smugmug.com/photos/507838105_MPVyP-M.jpg

Remove the retaining clip and using needlenose pliers, slide the retaining pin out to release the pads .You can see the retaining clip hole in the right end of the pin I have half way out
http://henzilla.smugmug.com/photos/507839605_UZaBM-M.jpg

I pulled one of the pads to show how they just set in and are held by the center pin. BTW, these pads have 124K miles on them! They still have the wear bars in them and are still good for a few thousand more miles at this rate.The pics are not as clear, but the pads are just under 3/16" We will prob change them mid summer. He is on second set on the rear. Gotta say the R12R is sure easier on pads than my RT!

http://henzilla.smugmug.com/photos/507838367_Use9g-M.jpg

Polarbear
04-08-2009, 01:12 PM
My GSA has 30k and no wear on the pads, or very darn little. My KLT had 95k and only the rear had been changed at 65k. Some riders may be harder on brakes, too. My GSA is my first bike with LINKED brakes, through the handlebar lever and I'm anxious to see how that wears them, but so far its been good. No pedal required most of the time:). Randy

Bud
04-08-2009, 02:25 PM
Most worthy thread. Great pics, clear directions. Well done.

I bet those guys with long miles on the brakes also get high mileage out of their tires. Smooth is the way to go. Not that I know how. :laugh

larry175
05-17-2009, 04:36 PM
THe front pads can be changed with calipers in place.:thumb

Remove retainer (2).
Remove screw (3).

Remove spring (1). notice the arrow again...goes in direction of wheel travel

Remove the brake pads

http://henzilla.smugmug.com/photos/502106786_PS7aL-M.jpg

BMW makes snazzy tools, once again you can use a dull flat tool such as a small tire iron to push pads apart.

http://henzilla.smugmug.com/photos/502106823_CHtv5-M.jpg

Also, same as on the rear, if you added fluid to resevoir, you will have to drain some off before doing this...good time to check anyways . Put a good absorbent rag between handlebar resevoir and painted parts!

Remove the brake pads and carefully set aside to match up new ones


Set new pads out and verify orientation as you removed old ones

Grease the rear and the trailing end face of the backing plate. An anti-seize paste is used here, I use permatex copper. Take care to grease only the rear and the trailing end face of the backing plate. Greasing the backing plate can allow grease to make its way onto the friction pad and the brake disc. A little grease goes a long way!:whistle

Install pads and reverse order of assembly using the first numbered picture:

Install spring (1) with the arrow pointing in the forward direction of travel.

Install screw (3). 7 Nm is the torque value...very small torque value so don't strip the dang screw!!

Install retainer (2).

Repeat process for second set...having fun yet?

Once the brake pads have been changed, clean both rotors with brake cleaner...

with the ignition switched on, seat the new pads against the brake discs and check operation of the brake system.

Top off resevoir and remember the heat cycle and the bedding in of the new pads.

I'm thinking of using the Carbone Lorraine pads, what do you think?

MRMAICO
05-17-2009, 05:54 PM
Nice write-up henzilla. On my 05 GS rear brake (non-abs but there shouldn't be any difference) I didn't even remove the caliper. I just pulled the pin and slid the pads out to the rear. Truly a 5 minute job.

Barry

henzilla
05-18-2009, 01:03 AM
larry175,
I have used those on several models with great results


mrmaico ,
great shortcut as long as that crazy flat spring stays put...have only had one ever fall out when pads were removed out of near 15 tries. I'm going to have to try your way in the morning!

MRMAICO
05-19-2009, 10:06 PM
larry175,
I have used those on several models with great results


mrmaico ,
great shortcut as long as that crazy flat spring stays put...have only had one ever fall out when pads were removed out of near 15 tries. I'm going to have to try your way in the morning!

When I did mine I didn't have any tech info to reference on how to go about the install. I remembered doing it that way on my KTM 300 10 years ago or so and just figured I'd try it and see what happened. Worked great and didn't have any trouble with the spring.

Have you given it a try yet?

Barry

henzilla
05-19-2009, 10:08 PM
Not yet, I bailed from any kind of work today and went riding!

Tlaw1994
10-11-2011, 05:03 PM
Great writeup. Do you need to cut the rotors when you change the pads, similar to car rotors?

thanks

pffog
10-11-2011, 06:14 PM
Great writeup. Do you need to cut the rotors when you change the pads, similar to car rotors?

thanks

NO. Most car rotors don't need it either, it is just a way for repair shops to make extra cash.

When they get too thin, replace them.

Tlaw1994
10-11-2011, 08:22 PM
thanks, what if you are feeling a pulsation when stopping? changing the pads would be sufficient? could the rotors be warpped?

marchyman
10-11-2011, 09:47 PM
Could be warped. Or it could be a case of pad material build up on the rotor. Or floating rotors that don't float any more. Or a bent rotor mounting boss on your wheel.

I you stop hard and then hold the brakes with a strong grip once stopped some pad material can transfer to the pads which will then be felt as a slight pulsation. Cleaning the rotors may help in that situation. I usually give mine a very light cleaning using a scotchbrite pad when changing brake pads. Some folks use sandpaper.

SteveAikens
10-12-2011, 02:04 PM
I used scotchbrite, then emery cloth several time on my rotors. Worked as well as can be expected and as miles built up, the result was less effective each time.

Following the 2011 Iron Butt Rally, there was no hope for a cleanup doing anything for the rotors so at something like 72,000 miles, I replaced both the rotors and pads on my 07.

It's like I'm on a new bike now.