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gboyvin
10-10-2007, 05:16 PM
I have had my 1200 RT for 6 months have have tried everything from hand grip covers to thick gloves in an effort to eliminate my right hand from going numb on rides. I have had several different bikes in the past (primarily HD) and I have never experienced this problem. My local delaer is at a loss for remedies, so I'm looking for ideas.:banghead

LENRT1200ST
10-10-2007, 05:30 PM
I have had my 1200 RT for 6 months have have tried everything from hand grip covers to thick gloves in an effort to eliminate my right hand from going numb on rides. I have had several different bikes in the past (primarily HD) and I have never experienced this problem. My local delaer is at a loss for remedies, so I'm look for ideas.:banghead

This may sound really simple, but I have found that a more relaxed grip in the bars will go a long way toward easing this problem.:thumb Light touch, better control too!

Len

17butler
10-10-2007, 05:40 PM
I use Throttle Rockers on both grips. These help me not to grip too tight. Then I scoot up in the seat for less weight on my hands. Plus, I use the Throttlemeister as much as possible. With my minimum carpel tunnel this all helps. Try it all!

R1150RS

cardno7
10-10-2007, 05:51 PM
if you are uneder 5'11", you may try bar backs or handle bar risers; worked great on my 1150rt

LTLJOHN
10-10-2007, 06:09 PM
I sometimes have the same problem. I loosen my grip and also move my elbow in closer to my body, not sure why this works but you can feel the difference immediately

OfficerImpersonator
10-10-2007, 06:10 PM
Watch how closely your clothing fits around your wrist. A tight strap on a glove or a tight cuff on a riding suit/jacket will cut off blood flow to your hand as surely as a tourniquet. If you're left-handed, a watch worn on the right wrist can get squeezed between your wrist and the fabric of your clothing, further constricting the blood flow into your hand.

Loosen up the restricting clothing around your wrist and let that blood flow into your hands!

MCOLLECT
10-10-2007, 06:24 PM
I find the single most important thing in keeping my hands comfortable is the bend at the wrist. The straighter it is, the more comfortable. So I start off by gripping way forward on the grip so that when twisting the throttle my wrist is a straight line from my forearm to hand.

sugarhillctd
10-10-2007, 06:45 PM
I sometimes have the same problem. I loosen my grip and also move my elbow in closer to my body, not sure why this works but you can feel the difference immediately

Excellent suggestion- and here is why it does work- Moving your elbows closer to your body has the effect of causing the muscles in your shoulders to relax.

Quite a few of the people that I see in my office have the same problem, but get these symptoms when driving a car. I have them try to hold the steering wheel further down towards the 4/5 o'clock and 7/8 o'clock position. This has the effect of allowing their shoulders to drop and relax.
"Bar-backs" may also help, as may stretching your shoulders before AND AFTER you ride.
These type of altered sensations are often attributed to a neurological cause but are many times due to muscular tightness- try "Googling" Trigger Points or look at this particular link:

http://www.triggerpointbook.com/neuropat.htm

Good luck.
John

gboyvin
10-10-2007, 09:45 PM
Thanks for the great feedback, I will certainly try all the suggestions. :thumb

queretaro
10-10-2007, 11:36 PM
The 1" up and 1" back risers from Cycle Concepts cured a numbness in my right index finger.
Mark

MARTYW
10-10-2007, 11:43 PM
I have the solution for you!

Try this website www.qwinerveprotector.com

I have carpal tunnel, and after a 1/2 hour on a bike, I'm locking the throttle on, so I can shake the tingling out of my hands. I bought a pair of Qwi gloves at the Wisconsin rally, and rode 400 miles the next day with NO numbness. What a great feeling!

These gloves have pads in the palms that protect the "ulnar nerve" that runs through there. They look just like regular riding gloves, with two small pads on the heel of your hand. It's so simple, and so effective.

I bought the fingerless version with the spandex back, which are very comfortable. I will buy a full leather set this fall for colder weather riding.

Best of luck
-Marty

Sorry if I've posted this information twice. I hit the submit button once, and didn't see that it got posted, so I wrote it again. The original may show up. My mom always said, if it's worth saying, it's worth repeating.

beeryboats
10-10-2007, 11:46 PM
I had the same problem on my first "long" ride on my RT. I relaxed my grip and used the outer part of my palm to hold the throttle verses the part by my thumb. Worked like a charm.

osbornk
10-11-2007, 11:22 AM
I find myself leaning on my hands and it makes them go numb. If I concentrate on keeping my weight off my hands, it helps a lot and loosening my grip also helps. The throttle rocker helps on my airhead but the cruise on my CLC is worth its weight in gold. Set the cruise for about 1/2 a minute and everything clears up for a while.

mlucas1
10-11-2007, 12:25 PM
My right hand gets very tired when I ride. I ordered a Throttlemeister and hope to get it today. I sure hope it helps. Like many of you I spend my day at a computer using the mouse and also have a sore hand from that. Combine that with riding and you have a sore hand. My chiropractor worked on my hand and that has seemed to help some but I'm really looking forward to the Throttlemeister.
Mark

MARTYW
10-11-2007, 09:43 PM
It sounds like a bunch of you guys would benefit from the Qwi gloves. Most of the symptoms you are describing are attributable to an irritated bundle of nerves. I'd suggest any of you to try them. Then you wouldn't have to adjust your riding posture, or worry about which part of your hand you hold the throttle with. You can grip it as tightly as you like, for as long as you like. If these gloves could make such a difference for me, with a fairly good case of carpal tunnel, I believe they could make a difference for just about anybody who has tingling in the hands.


I do not represent this company in any way, I just want to share my good fortune with somebody who has the same problem I had.

cwsenn
10-12-2007, 03:09 AM
How about just having the Carpal Release surgery? I have had both hands/wrist done and don''t have any numbness problems. It's a simple surgey and after my last hand (left) was done I was back on my bike after two weeks of recovery. Beats the heck out of numb fingers. Of course the orthoscopic prodedure is a faster recovery. I recently did a SS1000 without any problems at all.

Chuck

deilenberger
10-12-2007, 03:27 AM
Note: Moved this thread to the correct forum - since an R1200RT is a hexhead.

twins4life
10-12-2007, 11:33 AM
All those suggestions are good but let me add something I just learned.

I have your symptoms and have 1 of the three tests for carpal tunnel syndrome present, so I have minor carpal tunnel syndrome.

The chiropractor did a neck adjustment and a shoulder muscle massage. The nerves going down the arm to the hand pass through the shoulder muscles, if your shoulder muscles are tight then the squeeze on the nerves.

The improvement for me was immediate and definite.

osbornk
10-13-2007, 01:31 AM
Note: Moved this thread to the correct forum - since an R1200RT is a hexhead.

But I've had it with a K, oilhead and airhead as well as a bunch of UJMs.. Seems to be a universal problem.

deilenberger
10-13-2007, 11:47 PM
But I've had it with a K, oilhead and airhead as well as a bunch of UJMs.. Seems to be a universal problem.True - not model/make specific for sure - but some of the potential cures (bar-backs, bar-end weights, etc.) may be quite model specific. Hence - it got moved.

All of the above suggestions are excellent.. a few things I've learned help:

1 - heated grips on - helps keep circulation going in the hand
2 - leave the wrist straps on gloves loose
3 - if wearing a wristwatch on the numb hand's wrist - take it off. I've gone back to a pocketwatch..
4 - if the right hand is the problem - some sort of throttle assist helps a lot - so you don't have to grip as tight. I used the $0.12 poor mans throttle assist - a large O ring between the grip and housing. Keeps the throttle where I set it, but lets me easily roll it off. Helps with the touchy throttle on the R1200R
5 - don't tense up.
6 - don't lean on your hands - keep them neutral on your elbows "loose" (think flap them like a bird.. if you can't - they're too tight.)

And all the hints on it being a nerve problem are also good - mine is often a problem in the AM - not later in the day. Must be a compressed nerve somewhere..

briana
10-17-2007, 01:11 PM
Are the Qwi gloves any different then other gel gloves. I have the olympia gel gloves, which helped but i still et some numbness. I'm wondering if it's worth trying the Qwi gloves.
Brian

briana
10-17-2007, 02:09 PM
I just checked out their web site and found the answer to my question. I just ordered them. Full warranty, you can't go wrong. I hope they work.
Brian

thtduck
10-18-2007, 12:25 AM
This a very helpful thread! I purchased my first road bike last July and have experienced the right hand numbness. Elbows in as mentioned by others works! Thanks everyone.

2007 R1200R

LENRT1200ST
10-18-2007, 04:43 PM
This a very helpful thread! I purchased my first road bike last July and have experienced the right hand numbness. Elbows in as mentioned by others works! Thanks everyone.

2007 R1200R
1+ :thumb

grossjohann
10-18-2007, 04:52 PM
On the cruiser, my wrists were always straight and relaxed. My body was resting on my butt and not on my wrists. The sports-tourer positions my body much further forward (I'm 5"10"), and it's easy to let my upper body rest on my wrists while riding.

I took two descent rides this summer: one to Maine, and the other to Virginia. Most of the ride to Maine was plagued by numbness, and after about 1000 miles, enough soreness to get my attention.

I noticed that if my elbows were bent, then my hands and wrists were relaxed. I suppose bending my elbows a little forced me to hold my upper body with my stomach and back, and kept the pressure off my wrists.

In general, I am convinced that better physical health will help my motorcycling comfort and ability (see "Weary by Sundown" in the September BMW ON), and a part of that is better strength in my mid-section to support my weight and to keep the pressure off my wrists.

I hear too many stories of other riders who have given up the sport due to wrist issues...

Here's the "sore wrists" thread (numbness is usually a precursor to soreness):
http://www.bmwmoa.org/forum/showthread.php?t=20438

Mr_Canoehead
10-18-2007, 05:11 PM
All of the above suggestions are excellent.. a few things I've learned help:

2 - leave the wrist straps on gloves loose
..


Make sure you have the strap tight enough that the glove does not fly off in an accident. If you can pull the glove off with the other hand, it is too loose. The best glove in the world cant help you when it is not on your hand.

ANDYVH
10-18-2007, 08:15 PM
Although I ride an RS oilhead, I thought this may help. I made my own tubular handlebar setup to move my hands up about 2" and back about 1.5". My left hand fingers would go numb in 20 minutes of riding, and my left wrist would get sore, when I rode the bike with the stock handlebar position. I was starting to worry about carpal tunnel issues caused by the stock handlebar position, so I took the plunge and made my own handlebar setup. Actually, I used Honda tubular bar mounts and a K75S style handlebar.

Now, with the revised handlebar position, I can ride easily for hours for a tank full of gas with no discomfort in my left hand, and no numb fingers! Oh, I always wear gloves too.

So your hand/wrist position is critical to alleviate pain. But grip shape may also be an issue. Have you checkout the "flat" grips? Find them at:
hunterflatbars.com