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View Full Version : Fouled Fuel Injectors? BG 44K Solution!



JK
09-15-2007, 02:00 PM
FWIW -

Has your trusty thoroughred steed started to stagger and stumble? Has your motorcycle engine recently started to idle roughly, or hesitate slightly, when asked to accelerate? Finally, is your MPG gradually deteriorating?

Most likely, the cause of your performance concern could be as simple as fouled fuel injectors.

Fortunately, BG Products provides a simple and extremely effective solution for these mechanical ills. Their fuel injector cleaning product is called "BG 44K," and this fuel additive is literally a "tune-up" in a can. Not cheap (@ $22 a can), I can personally attest to its claims and benefits.

In summary, toss a 1/4 can of BG 44K into your ride, and the other 3/4 can into your car, and get ready to appreciate an immediate improvement in your engine's performance. Simply put, every 10K miles should do the trick.

Trust me....:thumb


J.K.

bbenton
09-16-2007, 01:40 PM
I'll second the benefits of BG 44K. I've been using it, personally and professionally, for the last 15 years with very good success in both fuel injected and carbureted engines. Be sure to follow the directions on mix rate.

JK
09-16-2007, 02:39 PM
I'll second the benefits of BG 44K. I've been using it, personally and professionally, for the last 15 years with very good success in both fuel injected and carbureted engines. Be sure to follow the directions on mix rate.

Many BMW riders, especially those who unintentionally lug their engines, are prone to fuel injector fouling. Hexheads require higher rpms for optimal performance and operation, when compared to "traditional" airheads, and old habits die hard.

Factor in storeage and stale fuel, a tank or two of "bad" gas, and it doesn't take long for injectors to foul.

Put another way, what appears as throttle bodies out of sync, engine surging and hesitation, and rough idling and loss of fuel economy and performance can easily be "cured" by simply adding a quarter can of BG 44K to a full tank of gas.

Given the hassle and expense of scheduling Dealer maintenance and trouble shooting, strongly recommend the benefits of using this product.


J.K.

P.S. BMW computers can only do so much to adjust and compensate for reduced octane fuel and poor fuel injector spray patterns. :drink

MOTOR31
09-16-2007, 08:21 PM
Running a pretty consistent flow of Chevron won't hurt any either and is a bit less expensive.

deilenberger
09-16-2007, 11:34 PM
Many BMW riders, especially those who unintentionally lug their engines, are prone to fuel injector fouling. Hexheads require higher rpms for optimal performance and operation, when compared to "traditional" airheads, and old habits die hard.
I don't understand the mechanism by which lugging an engine can foul fuel injectors. Please elucidate..


Factor in storeage and stale fuel, a tank or two of "bad" gas, and it doesn't take long for injectors to foul.

Put another way, what appears as throttle bodies out of sync, engine surging and hesitation, and rough idling and loss of fuel economy and performance can easily be "cured" by simply adding a quarter can of BG 44K to a full tank of gas. I avoid stale gasoline by just riding the bike year round. Heated gear is a good thing. ;)


Given the hassle and expense of scheduling Dealer maintenance and trouble shooting, strongly recommend the benefits of using this product.

J.K.

P.S. BMW computers can only do so much to adjust and compensate for reduced octane fuel and poor fuel injector spray patterns. :drinkWhile FI cleaner is useful at times (I prefer Chevron Techron - which BMW sells relabeled as BMW Fuel Injector Cleaner in the car stores..) - It can be overused. There are some concerns with over use causing contamination of the engine's oil..

If one sticks to "TopTier"gas - as defined and approved by BMW (and several other manufacturers) and avoids storing the bike with fuel in it and no fuel stabilizer - I'd question if FI cleaner ever is really needed. It hasn't been on most of the modern BMW cars I own (at well over 100k miles without using it..)

BTW - the website is www.toptiergas.com - worth taking a visit and reading a bit. What works for the car will work for the bike - the systems are basically identical.

akbeemer
09-17-2007, 06:47 PM
Okay Don, now you've opened an entirely new can of worms... storage. I live in the interior of Alaska and riding year around is not an option. I'll need to store my new 07 RT for 5-6 months every year (If I'm lucky I may have another 2-3 weeks of riding this year). My plan is to add fuel stablizer, fresh oil and filter and connect the battery charger. I'd appreciate your sage advice.
K. Huddy
Fairbank, Alaska

deilenberger
09-17-2007, 07:14 PM
Okay Don, now you've opened an entirely new can of worms... storage. I live in the interior of Alaska and riding year around is not an option. I'll need to store my new 07 RT for 5-6 months every year (If I'm lucky I may have another 2-3 weeks of riding this year). My plan is to add fuel stablizer, fresh oil and filter and connect the battery charger. I'd appreciate your sage advice.
K. Huddy
Fairbank, AlaskaSounds like you have it pretty well covered. If you're planning on doing another oil/filter change in the spring, if it was me - I'd just drain the current filter, put in the fresh oil, take it for a ride to warm it up well and circulate it - then put it away. Put a new filter and oil on in the spring. Is the spot where you store your RT heated (at least above freezing?)

JK
09-17-2007, 08:41 PM
I don't understand the mechanism by which lugging an engine can foul fuel injectors. Please elucidate.

Hi Don -

Here's further "elucidation" and documentation supporting my assertion (the long story):

http://www.babcox.com/editorial/us/us30232.htm

The short story is that lugging (high loads/low RPMs) will cause incomplete combustion. When detected by the engine monitoring computer, attempts will be made to adjust the air/fuel ratio, to optimize the balance. :wow

As a direct consequence, instead of a steady flow and mixture through the fuel injectors and combustion chamber, the flow and mixture oscillates between too rich, to too lean. And this oscillation (rapid computer prompted adjustments in flow and mixture/pintle valve) accelerates the build up process.

Finally, a close friend and former Service Manager of Bay BMW, Massimo Mondino, swears by BG 44K and turned me on to the practical benefits of the product.

FWIW


J.K. :bottle


P.S. Can you say, "pintle valve?"

deilenberger
09-17-2007, 09:13 PM
Hi Don -

Here's further "elucidation" and documentation supporting my assertion (the long story):

http://www.babcox.com/editorial/us/us30232.htm

That's a very nice simplistic look at FI diagnostics, but please point me to the paragraph referring to lugging an engine.. I can't quite seem to locate it.


The short story is that lugging (high loads/low RPMs) will cause incomplete combustion. When detected by the engine monitoring computer, attempts will be made to adjust the air/fuel ratio, to optimize the balance. :wow

As a direct consequence, instead of a steady flow and mixture through the fuel injectors and combustion chamber, the flow and mixture oscillates between too rich, to too lean. And this oscillation (rapid computer prompted adjustments in flow and mixture/pintle valve) accelerates the build up process.
The injector is open or closed. It doesn't go partly open. The FI system is actually quite good at optimizing the mixture, and how low RPMs will cause incomplete combustion that would somehow foul the injectors is a total mystery to me.

Is there something changing in the air pump charactistics of the engine? Is the air flowing backwards towards the injectors?

I'd really suggest seeing if your local library has a copy of "Bosch Fuel Injection" by Robert Probst. Although it's a somewhat old book now - the ideas and technology is little changed, and it covers all the technologies our new hexhead engines have (O2 sensors, knock sensors) that keep them SO well tuned.

Finally, a close friend and former Service Manager of Bay BMW, Massimo Mondino, swears by BG 44K and turned me on to the practical benefits of the product.

FWIW

J.K. :bottle

P.S. Can you say, "pintle valve?"

I certainly can't argue with what your close friend has told you, but I'm afraid I have my own opinions, based on some small familiarity with fuel injection, electronics and engine control system design, so I'll have to beg to differ.

IMHO - most use of fuel-injection cleaners is a "feel good" thing - you feel good because you put a treat into your engine, which you feel must appreciate it. Not a bad thing to do - but it's not magic, and only needed for very specific problems. That's my opinion. Feel free to differ.

Cleaner *was* needed and recommended by BMW back in the mid '80's on their cars - due to both the design of the Bosch injectors used at that time, and the quality of the fuel and lack of detergent in the fuel. BMW stopped recommending this in the late 80's when the fuel companies met BMW's first published fuel requirements. The problem then was called "coking" of the pintle - where dripping fuel on the end of the injector was carbonized by residual engine heat, leaving deposits behind. That doesn't happen with modern injectors using modern gasoline.

Best,

JK
09-17-2007, 10:32 PM
Cleaner *was* needed and recommended by BMW back in the mid '80's on their cars - due to both the design of the Bosch injectors used at that time, and the quality of the fuel and lack of detergent in the fuel. BMW stopped recommending this in the late 80's when the fuel companies met BMW's first published fuel requirements. The problem then was called "coking" of the pintle - where dripping fuel on the end of the injector was carbonized by residual engine heat, leaving deposits behind. That doesn't happen with modern injectors using modern gasoline.

Best,

Hi Don -

Per website, guess GM automotive engineers disagree with you about the merits of modern American gasoline, and the tendency for fuel injector fouling:

http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=312573

Oh well, guess we'll agree to disagree. :brow


J.K.

P.S. Sadly, it's extremely hard to comment on something that isn't happening. Kind of like Final Drive Failure rates.

deilenberger
09-18-2007, 04:17 AM
Hi Don -

Per website, guess GM automotive engineers disagree with you about the merits of modern American gasoline, and the tendency for fuel injector fouling:

http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=312573

Oh well, guess we'll agree to disagree. :brow

J.K.

P.S. Sadly, it's extremely hard to comment on something that isn't happening. Kind of like Final Drive Failure rates.JK,

Interesting story - but can't see that BG44 is going to solve sulphuric acid in the gasoline. That will eat up an injector and fuel system - not "foul" it. That particular article appears to be a bit old - it's referring to things that happened a year ago (references to "last fall") and mentions the problem has been cleared up.

BTW - someone pointed out to me in private email - the other link you posted - was by an advertiser for BG44, so I'd guess they might have a tiny bit of bias on it's need. Just noticed - I actually receive a few of their magazines - they are "advertising" focused technical magazines. They exist for no other purpose than to sell products listed in them. The technical articles are more or less filler (I actually used to own such a publication myself.. )

JK
09-18-2007, 06:42 PM
JK,

Interesting story - but can't see that BG44 is going to solve sulphuric acid in the gasoline. That will eat up an injector and fuel system - not "foul" it. That particular article appears to be a bit old - it's referring to things that happened a year ago (references to "last fall") and mentions the problem has been cleared up.

BTW - someone pointed out to me in private email - the other link you posted - was by an advertiser for BG44, so I'd guess they might have a tiny bit of bias on it's need. Just noticed - I actually receive a few of their magazines - they are "advertising" focused technical magazines. They exist for no other purpose than to sell products listed in them. The technical articles are more or less filler (I actually used to own such a publication myself.. )

Chimply speaking, Don -

1) Fuel injectors get fouled/EFI engine performance gradually deteriorates.
2) BG44K works extremely well as a fuel injector cleaner/improves performance.
3) Gasoline standards and quality are not uniform, contributing to the problem.
4) Have used the stuff for over ten years (750iL/175K, 535is/120K, Def90/135K).
5) MOA members might also benefit from its use, if experiencing performance problems (the old KISS principle).
6) Don't need/want to publish a dissertation on the HOWs and WHYs, did enough of that in my squandered youth.
7) Still glad to encourage others to share advice and counsel, after nearly 30 years of riding BMW motorcycles and MOA membership. (Always learning something new)


Cheers! :buds