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ggfossen
08-22-2007, 02:43 PM
Much has been written/asked about numb hands, and how to fix the problem. Many have suggested the simply gripping too hard with the right hand may contribute to the problem. I think it does.

Yesterday, purely by accident, I stumbled on something that helped my problem.

Many of you old timers may know this, but I didn't, and I, like, ain't young.

With the new RT, I have been consciously trying to place my hands as close as possible to the inner ring on the grips so as to have my fingers closer to the control buttons.

Yesterday, I let my hand natually drift out a bit (perhaps I am finally beginning to relax??), and found that, with my glove resting on the unmoveable bar end and on the throttle, it was much easier to maintain throttle position with a lighter grip. Sort of like a mini cruise controlled comprised of one ham-handed leather glove. It made life easier.

Gary

klrobins
08-22-2007, 03:10 PM
I LOVE my crampbuster!!! If you want to loosen your grip on the throttle side try one of these. I have the wide one on my GS and now I dont know how I ever rode without it, expecially long distance.

http://www.crampbuster.com/

FredRydr
08-22-2007, 03:55 PM
This has recently become a real issue for me, and I hate to admit it, but it is probably caused by the new posture of my R1200R after moving from my R1150R. I thought they were pretty close, but maybe not.

My doctor has in the past mentioned that if my thumb, index finger and middle finger are numb, it indicates one problem, while if the middle, ring and small fingers are numb, it is another. I have the former, and on both hands. One or both hands will be affected when doing anything, even numb when I wake in the morning. I ride about 1,500+ miles month average. So, it's off to the doctor.

I realize everyone is a different shape and size and lean into their bike in a variety of ways, but any feedback from those who've been through this would be appreciated. I'm not uncomfortable on the Roadster, but something's amiss. Help me tweak the ergonomics of my handlebars.

Fred
'07

P.S. I already have a Throttlemeister and a crampbuster-type thing.

69974
08-22-2007, 04:35 PM
A few years ago I noticed that my hands, mostly the outside fingers, were going numb more severely when riding. I also began to have the problem at night if I slept with my arms bent. This kind of numbness is caused by the nerve that goes through the underside of the elbow.

I came across an article that said people who take stomach acid blocking meds often have this problem, which I do. You need the stomach acid to get the vitamin B12 out of food and B12 is necessary for nerve health. Well, I started taking B12 supplements and in about 6 months the numbness problem was pretty much gone, in a year I was not having that problem at all when riding.

deilenberger
08-23-2007, 03:58 PM
This has recently become a real issue for me, and I hate to admit it, but it is probably caused by the new posture of my R1200R after moving from my R1150R. I thought they were pretty close, but maybe not.

My doctor has in the past mentioned that if my thumb, index finger and middle finger are numb, it indicates one problem, while if the middle, ring and small fingers are numb, it is another. I have the former, and on both hands. One or both hands will be affected when doing anything, even numb when I wake in the morning. I ride about 1,500+ miles month average. So, it's off to the doctor.

I realize everyone is a different shape and size and lean into their bike in a variety of ways, but any feedback from those who've been through this would be appreciated. I'm not uncomfortable on the Roadster, but something's amiss. Help me tweak the ergonomics of my handlebars.

Fred
'07

P.S. I already have a Throttlemeister and a crampbuster-type thing.

Fred, since we're basically the same shape/size (short, fat..) and we ride identical bikes (except mine has more farkles..)

What worked for me:

The slip on foam covers from beemerboneyard.com help.. they increase the grip diameter making it easier to grip. The additional softness doesn't hurt either.

Take off your watch if your watch hand (in my case - right since I'm a lefty) goes numb..

Add a throttle drag device to the throttle. Mine is a simple O ring between the grip-flange and the throttle-housing. It adds enough friction that the throttle will stay where it's set unless I back it off. It adds almost no effort to opening the throttle and no effort to closing it. On K bikes and airheads I used the BMW throttle screw to do the same thing. That's the poor-mans way - Throttlemiester and others can do the same thing for more $$$.

Gel-palm-gloves - may help if any vibration is causing the numbness.

================================================== ===

The tricks above eliminated the problem for me about 90% of the time. For some reason I sometimes still feel it on my way to work in the morning... rarely if ever bothers me other than that. The foam grips and throttle-drag allow you to loosely grip the bars - not clench down on them, and that helps a lot.

You have the throttlemeister and a cramp buster.. I'd say the $6 foam slip on's from beemerboneyard are next on the list.

pgods
08-23-2007, 05:27 PM
Kaoko throttle lock. For distance riding, it's a godsend!

FredRydr
08-23-2007, 06:41 PM
Fred, since we're basically the same shape/size (short, fat..) I'd say the $6 foam slip on's from beemerboneyard are next on the list.Gasp! Fat? I'm in denial. (I'm also in increasingly tight leathers.)

I bought those very foam slip-ons from Mike Figeleski. I felt as though my fingers did not go far enough around the grip, so I removed them. Maybe I should give them another try.

Fred

deilenberger
08-23-2007, 06:53 PM
Gasp! Fat? I'm in denial. (I'm also in increasingly tight leathers.)
You could think of it like my sister does "fluffy" - but somehow that doesn't seem to fit me.. mebbe "lumpy"?
I bought those very foam slip-ons from Mike Figeleski. I felt as though my fingers did not go far enough around the grip, so I removed them. Maybe I should give them another try.

Fred
Worth a try if you have them already for sure. I've never liked a small grip on a street bike (going back about 40 years now) since I stopped riding dirty bikes (where you had to use the grip to loft the front wheel sometimes..) Bigger is better for me especially as arthritis and stuff like that sneaks up on us youngsters..

planepaul1949
08-31-2007, 01:30 AM
I heard about Qwi gloves on one of these forums. They have pads that serve to protect the carpal nerve in the center of the wrist. They work for me. I use moto-x gloves for hot weather riding, and notice the difference big time.
QwiNerveProtector.com is the website. Good pricing, too.
A throttle rocker helps a bunch, too.
Paul in CA
'05 R1200RT

redclfco
08-31-2007, 01:39 AM
I heard about Qwi gloves on one of these forums. They have pads that serve to protect the carpal nerve in the center of the wrist. They work for me. I use moto-x gloves for hot weather riding, and notice the difference big time.
QwiNerveProtector.com is the website. Good pricing, too.
A throttle rocker helps a bunch, too.
Paul in CA
'05 R1200RT

I have had the same problem, and normally have ridden with leather ropers with a huge sheepskin pile year round. It gets a bit hot during summer, so I bought a pair of gloves at the rally this year that protect the carpal nerve in the center of the wrist like you describe above, and the numbness has all but gone away.

nortonrt
08-31-2007, 01:49 AM
The description of numb fingers, middle, ring, and pinky, suggest a cervical vertebrae issue; this description fits that dermatome (google if you like) perfectly. So, basically, what's troubling those with numb fingers such as the problems described here, may really neck issues. So, monitor the way you hold your head when you ride, particularly long distances when your neck muscles are likely to become fatigued. And ask yourself if you sometimes wake up in the morning with numb fingers, and the numbness goes away when you change the position of your head. The best resource for information and advice on this issue is your primary care physician, but be prepared to describe how you hold your head while riding.

bobh41
08-31-2007, 06:23 AM
I learned to deal with all the numbing effects by simply moving positions as frequently as necessary to eliminate them. Change your neck position by shifting back and forth on the saddle, and by moving your elbows up, down, in, out. Move the contact point for your hands by rolling them slightly to the side, etc.

You have to have a pretty steady position in traffic, but you still can vary it enough to reduce or eliminate the numbing, and still have good hand control.

I think the human body was not designed to sit still for very long, even in sleep.

lawman
08-31-2007, 08:41 PM
I have never had a problem with numb fingers but you have raised a collateral problem which sometines plagues me- inadvertantly kicking of the cruise control with what is probably too tight a grip with my right hand on my R12; in my past I owned three Gold Wings and never had this problem; I probably do grip too tightly at times but I am wondering if there is a tension control somewhere that could allow a little more pressure before kicking off the cc.

mrich12000
08-31-2007, 09:29 PM
Gasp! Fat? I'm in denial. (I'm also in increasingly tight leathers.)

I bought those very foam slip-ons from Mike Figeleski. I felt as though my fingers did not go far enough around the grip, so I removed them. Maybe I should give them another try.

Fred:stick :gerg :rofl :rofl :jawdrop :hide

The Nile is a river in Egipt:wow

mrich12000
08-31-2007, 09:42 PM
My problem is in the crotch area, long runs gives me the "Monkey butt"
My personal fellow and area goes to sleep lack of blood and I have to get off every 2-3 hours ouchI have an older Corbin and I hate it budget restrants prevent me getting a newer type so I suffer :banghead :wave

ANDYVH
08-31-2007, 09:44 PM
Sorry if an Oilheader is responding in the Hexhead section, but here's a couple cents worth of my experience.

I have ridden a R1100RS for over 12 years. Starting about eight years ago my left hand fingers would go numb/tingle, and my left wrist would get sore within twenty miles of highway riding. I had stock handlebars with foam grips and Throttlemeister and a Parabellum windshield. I should also say I am 5'-6" tall with a 30" inseam.

I always though bar-backs may help, but I just did not care for the appearrance of them. Finally, this spring I modified the top plate to accept tubular handlebar mounts from a small Japanese street bike, and then made my own K75 low handlebar. It moved the grips about 2" up and maybe 1.5" back.

WOW! What a difference! Now I can ride for hours with no numbness, tingle or pain at all. So for some of you, it may be just the handlebar position.

bricciphoto
08-31-2007, 11:08 PM
Gel-palm-gloves - may help if any vibration is causing the numbness.


Fred, I'm not endorsing gel palm gloves per se, but Don might be on to something here. I was having trouble with my hands (numbness) and elbows. I figured it was the orientation of the bars on my ST. One day I accidentally wore an old pair of gloves, and voila, no more numbness or elbow pain. I know this is anectdotal, but there must have been something in the design of the new gloves that was causing the numbness and pain. To this day, I can wear that one pair of gloves and induce numbness/pain. Try switching gloves. It's simple, but made a complete difference for me with the same riding posture. Sounds too simple, I know. :wave

podsobinski
09-02-2007, 01:18 PM
After too many years riding and racing motorcycles, I have found that using products like Aspercreme or any similar pain relieving creme works great. I rub it into both hands like hand lotion then put my gloves on without wiping off the excess and off you go. I can last without numbing, locking up or whatever. Of course the electronic cruise on my RT doesn;t hurt.:)

gpodzo

There are two types of people in this world, people who ride motorcycles and those who wish they could ride motorcycles.

grossjohann
09-11-2007, 01:36 AM
Much has been written/asked about numb hands, and how to fix the problem. Many have suggested the simply gripping too hard with the right hand may contribute to the problem. I think it does...

I let my hand natually drift out a bit... It made life easier.

Gary


Gary,

I've been riding for about 15 years without any numbness or discomfort. Last year, I went from cruiser to sport-tourer, and almost immediately started having numbness in my hands while riding. I spend about 10 hours daily in front of a computer, and that may have "weakened" the nerves in my wrists, but something in my riding position was causing numbness within 20-30 miles of highway (not twisties where I have a more aggressive riding position, and I shift my body position regularly).

There may be something to the neck position argument (I was sitting further back before), and perhaps also to the B12 argument (I hardly eat red meat anymore), but I believe my issue is most directly related to the amount of pressure which is exerted on my wrists while extended upward.

On the cruiser, my wrists were always straight and relaxed. My body was resting on my butt and not on my wrists. The sports-tourer positions my body much further forward (I'm 5"10"), and it's easy to let my upper body rest on my wrists while riding.

I took two descent rides this summer: one to Maine, and the other to Virginia. Most of the ride to Maine was plagued by numbness, and after about 1000 miles, enough soreness to get my attention.

Immediate relief for the numbness was to simply rotate my wrists every 10-15 minutes. Within seconds, I could feel the blood flowing again, and the feeling came right back.

By the end of the ride I realized that if I focused on using my stomach and back to support my weight, then my wrists would be more relaxed, and numbness was significantly reduced.

During the start of my last ride to Virginia, I put in about 600 miles for two days, and I had nearly no numbness whatsoever...

The last day of the VA ride, I noticed that if my elbows were bent, then my hands and wrists were relaxed. I suppose bending my elbows a little forced me to hold my upper body with my stomach and back, and kept the pressure off my wrists.

In general, I am convinced that better physical health will help my motorcycling comfort and ability (see "Weary by Sundown" in the September BMW ON), and a part of that is better strength in my mid-section to support my weight and to keep the pressure off my wrists.

I hear too many stories of other riders who have given up the sport due to wrist issues, and wrist numbness seems to be a precursor to worse things to come. Let's not let that happen to us!

-Alex