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swleejr
08-12-2007, 04:43 AM
Hi

Ok, so a nice opened question to for all to respond in all kinds of manner ...so fire away..but...just to add more detail before you answer;)

Now that I am the proud owner of a new R1200GS, I've never owned a new bike with all of 7 miles on the odometer. (so far a 1998 F650GS, 2002 R1150RS all with >2k miles on it) So what now.

How do I ride this thing so I break it in "correctly" (in your most esteemed opinion). Should I stress the engine with all sorts of RPM's and speeds so the seals work in, or should I keep it a fixed speeds/RPM's so everything gets worked in well?

The only thing I know is to put miles on it.

I searched the forum and did not find specific information on this.

Thank you.

Oh BTW, so here is the bike (It ROCKS), the day I got it home.

hass
08-12-2007, 06:14 AM
There's alot of theories out there - but here's mine:

Follow the instructions in the User manual. At least that way if you have problems and you are asked if you broke in the bike as per BMW instructions you can reply honestly and not void your warranty.

AZ-J
08-12-2007, 07:01 AM
I have an '07 F800S with an 8.5K red-line. I was told first 400 miles, keep the RPM under 4K, from 400 to 500 miles, no more than 5K, 500 to 600 miles, no more than 6k, and then bring in for a 600 mile service including first oil change. After 600 miles, my break-in was deemed over and I could RPM as high as red line thereafter. I do so often!:brad

Your RPM quotient may vary, but the principal is the same. Keep pushing it higher after due tolerance is the way to go.

Tweety1, aka Jordan

FredRydr
08-12-2007, 10:29 AM
...should I keep it a fixed speeds/RPM's...?I've always been instructed to avoid this during break-in.

Fred
'07 R

PAULBACH
08-12-2007, 11:16 AM
Hi

Now that I am the proud owner of a new R1200GS, I've never owned a new bike with all of 7 miles on the odometer. (so far a 1998 F650GS, 2002 R1150RS all with >2k miles on it) So what now.

How do I ride this thing so I break it in "correctly" (in your most esteemed opinion). Should I stress the engine with all sorts of RPM's and speeds so the seals work in, or should I keep it a fixed speeds/RPM's so everything gets worked in well?

The only thing I know is to put miles on it.


Put the right kind of miles on it. Test all ranges and components. Drive slow, drive fast, go through all the gears - many times. Test electrical components by running all accessories at the same time. Tough time of year to test under load with Gerbings but ... . Basically you are looking for the loose fastener or some component that is not fitted correctly or may out of spec.

Have fun.

Rich
08-12-2007, 11:31 AM
Read your owner's manual. It's right there in black and white. You won't go wrong doing it the way they want you to.

Congrats on the new bike.

swleejr
08-12-2007, 11:45 AM
Hi

Thanks for the information.

Manual states "While running in the motorcycle, vary the throttle opening and engine speed range frequently." "Try to do most of your riding druing this initial periond on twisting, fairly hilly roads, avoiding high-speed main roads and highways if possible."

Well that sounds much like a prescription for a long commute every morning and as many detours as I can find. However, the reality is that I commute down the highway 22miles and 22miles home 5 days a week, and only get an occasional Saturday to actually be in the hills.

So what I have been trying to do is to speed up and slow down and run between gears 4-5 and 6 for the morning (which is easier with less traffic) and I run between gears 3-4-5-6 on the way home (when there is more traffic - even in the "commuter lane"). I rev between 2500 and 5000 rpm in each gear. I'm hoping this will be good enough since its difficult to follow the manual.

I have to admit, the bike's been great. Very smooth on the road, nicely balanced. I think I'll need to adjust the handle bars down a bit (rotating them) but the seats been great and the windshield is perfect for me. I have it lowered down 2 notches. I got the Red color. Starting to contemplate the additions.

easy
08-12-2007, 02:19 PM
I've always been instructed to avoid this during break-in.

Fred
'07 R

I agree :thumb

Just remember, some dealers will use bad break-in riding as an excuse to void a warranty.

I wonder how The Veg is breaking in his new GS.

Easy :german

AZ-J
08-12-2007, 03:34 PM
Just remember, some dealers will use bad break-in riding as an excuse to void a warranty.




And my dealer told me the oil out of my bike at 600 miles was the clearest he had ever seen, as in no pieces of "flash". Swleejr, I hope you get the same report.

Don't worry. Just ride it at varying speeds and if you are just commuting do that bored left and right, and left and right thing while going straight, now and then, and no one or few are watching you.:rofl That's what I did on the AZ 51 when I commuted. The HOV lane "diamonds" made nice "pass left"- "pass right" targets. They always have...:laugh

The jokes are to say just; enjoy it as you vary speed and lean it over one and another. You want to make sure it breaks in doing the things bikes do, just a little more gently at first, and then, well don't ask me; my bike red lines between 8.5 and 9K, and I hit it in the low gears as often as I can. Thankfully for the bike, it neither needs that that often, or cares - that what it is supposed to do and it does it well.

PGlaves
08-12-2007, 05:21 PM
If you just run down the coast highway to about Lompoc and back it should be broken in just right - and ready for the 600 mi. service.

redhorse554
08-12-2007, 08:08 PM
with computers now part of the engine management system..dealers can read yur break in period history.there are pro's and con's of running a new eng. hard
or the manuf. way.


yam road warrior '02
bmw 1150rt '04
:deal

deilenberger
08-13-2007, 12:59 PM
Read your owner's manual. It's right there in black and white. You won't go wrong doing it the way they want you to.

Congrats on the new bike.+++1

Agree entirely. I broke my '07 R1200R in "by the book" - 600 miles of moderate riding, varying speeds, trying to stay below 4K and no prolonged running above 4k. I then took it for a long trip that involved some very twisty roads - lots of 2nd-3rd gear pulls uphills and using engine braking downhill. At the end of 3 days of this sort of riding - it had stopped using oil. It then had about 3,000 miles on it. It used no oil between 3k and 6,000 when I did the 6,000 mile service.

It now has BMW synthetic oil in it and it's running better than ever.

I always wonder what engineering degrees, or test-bed experience the people who recommend other than following the manufacturers recommendation have. It's not like BMW has an interest in you not breaking the engine in correctly..

LENRT1200ST
08-14-2007, 12:51 PM
+1

Same story. No oil use after the second service. She used about 1/2 quart between 600 and 6000 miles, all totaled.

Len
2006 R1200ST

RIDERR1150GSADV
08-14-2007, 01:00 PM
Ride it like you stole it but keep within the manufactures recommended engine RPM's for the mileage on the ODO.
I babied my first bike too much and it used oil till 18k miles. The GS I have I did stay within the spec's for break in, but rode it way more aggressively. So far 40K miles and the bike does not use a drop of oil between services since 6K.
Frequent shifting in combination with city and highway riding makes for a better run in motor IMHO. YMMV

Mongo
08-14-2007, 01:48 PM
IMO


Vary the throttle thru your first oil change
Don't lug it!
Change your oil as per the manual.

That is how I've broken in all my bikes motors. I've never had an issue with any of them.

The_Veg
08-14-2007, 11:09 PM
I wonder how The Veg is breaking in his new GS.

Pretty much by the book; varying RPM and keeping the engine loaded. Been up in the RPMs a couple of times but just for a couple of seconds. Sometimes on a long stretch I'll row back and forth up and down all the gears in which I can travel at reasonable speeds for the road. I have not ridden in over a week due to 100F+ temps, but with 343 miles on the bike (it had 2 miles when I bought it) I can tell a big difference in the engine- it's much smoother, tighter, and just seems healthier. I have not noticed any oil consumption yet, but given a few more miles I'm sure I will.

swleejr
08-15-2007, 03:39 PM
Hi

Veg, thanks for the information. I've been following your thread about getting the New GS. I've been trying the same thing in the flats I've been riding. Seems the method is basically the same. I'll keep doing what everyone has suggested.

Thanks to everyone for helping the noob out.
:clap