PDA

View Full Version : Bar set backs K75S



bmwrebel
09-05-2003, 02:20 AM
I would like to raise and move back the handle bars on my K75S.:dunno :cat

knary
09-05-2003, 08:27 AM
Get a "C" style handlebar. More specifically, go to your local dealer and place an order for a "Euro Standard" bar. They come from, if I remember correctly, the plain K100 that was sold in Europe. They are a bit higher and a bit wider. They are nearly the exact proportions of the "C" bar, but a bit less expensive and come pre-drilled for heated grips. You get more comfort, and more leverage. They were the best thing I ever put on my K75s.

kbasa
09-05-2003, 04:05 PM
C bars are the way to go. Will it interfere with the little dash pad with the switches and stuff? I can't remember anymore....

knary
09-05-2003, 06:00 PM
Originally posted by KBasa
C bars are the way to go. Will it interfere with the little dash pad with the switches and stuff? I can't remember anymore....
Yes, a bit. You have to either cut the dash pad on the sides, or, as I did, make some little extender bits so that the pad floats an additional inch from its original position.

Does it look as good? no. But if you wanted a good looking bike, you wouldn't buy a K-bike, would you? :evil

deilenberger
09-10-2003, 02:47 AM
Originally posted by knary
Yes, a bit. You have to either cut the dash pad on the sides, or, as I did, make some little extender bits so that the pad floats an additional inch from its original position.

Does it look as good? no. But if you wanted a good looking bike, you wouldn't buy a K-bike, would you? :evil

Well - Scott and I have different priorities :-)

I put C bars on my S after a 1,000 mile round trip. The stock bars were good at speed and a real pain in the wrists at lower speeds when the wind didn't hold my weight off the grips.

As far as the pad - I just trimmed a bit of the rubber off the bottom surface where the bars exit - and the pad fit fine. Not a big deal to do - installing them with heated grips was much more of a project.

Luckily - the C bars almost look like they belong on the bike. No one but me has noticed the difference.

Oh - you won't need new cables - just snip the tie-wraps under the tank and slip them fowards a bit. Then install new tie-wraps (not too tight - most people WAY overtighten them). You can get the grips and wiring off without disconnecting them (except for the heated grip connection, which has to be disassembled) if you take the clamps off - then move the bars as far as they'll go in one direction - remove the grip assembly on the other end, then do the reverse.

Total time - perhaps 3 hours, which includes removing and reinstalling the tank.

HTH

knary
09-10-2003, 05:15 AM
Originally posted by deilenberger
Well - Scott and I have different priorities :-)

I put C bars on my S after a 1,000 mile round trip. The stock bars were good at speed and a real pain in the wrists at lower speeds when the wind didn't hold my weight off the grips.

As far as the pad - I just trimmed a bit of the rubber off the bottom surface where the bars exit - and the pad fit fine. Not a big deal to do - installing them with heated grips was much more of a project.

Luckily - the C bars almost look like they belong on the bike. No one but me has noticed the difference.

Oh - you won't need new cables - just snip the tie-wraps under the tank and slip them fowards a bit. Then install new tie-wraps (not too tight - most people WAY overtighten them). You can get the grips and wiring off without disconnecting them (except for the heated grip connection, which has to be disassembled) if you take the clamps off - then move the bars as far as they'll go in one direction - remove the grip assembly on the other end, then do the reverse.

Total time - perhaps 3 hours, which includes removing and reinstalling the tank.

HTH
I couldn't resist. :)

The only difficulty I had with my installation way back when was with the heated grips. I used a bit too much force with one grip not realizing that I hadn't fed in enough of the bigger wire (technical term). One of the itty bitty wires where the bigger wire connected to the actual grip broke. I subsequently fried much of the wiring harness when my soldering job failed and caused a short. bad scott. bad bad bad scott.

I can not emphasize enough how much better the bike felt with the higher and wider bars.

deilenberger
09-10-2003, 01:18 PM
Originally posted by knary
I couldn't resist. :)


Somehow I knew that.. :brow



The only difficulty I had with my installation way back when was with the heated grips. I used a bit too much force with one grip not realizing that I hadn't fed in enough of the bigger wire (technical term). One of the itty bitty wires where the bigger wire connected to the actual grip broke. I subsequently fried much of the wiring harness when my soldering job failed and caused a short. bad scott. bad bad bad scott.

I can not emphasize enough how much better the bike felt with the higher and wider bars.

I have the bike at work today, boss is out, and I promised LaminarLip people a photo of the lip they made for me - so I'll send some of the C bar install also up to my website..