Airheaded
Blog Home All Blogs
Search all posts for:   

 

View all (10) posts »
 

3V Racing's maiden voyage

Posted By Dave Kaechele #4562, Thursday, October 12, 2017

About a year ago, I responded to an advertisement for a Slash 5 front end for sale at Dutch Trash Choppers in Portland, Oregon. The owner, Noll Van Zweiten, builds choppers and sidecars. Thinking I would not be long, my wife, Deborah, decided to wait in the car. When I went in the shop, I looked to the side and there was a BMW sidecar chassis in the shop.

I walked out of the shop and called my friend, Jason Vaden, and told him about the sidecar chassis, asking if he was interested in going together to buy it. He paused about a few seconds and said yes. That was the start of 3V Racing, named after Jason and his sons Vincent and Hans.

My wife said, “You go into the shop to buy a front end and come out buying a sidecar, too. I thought we were done with racing. I should have known better.” I raced a R 75/5 BMW vintage twin road race bike for 20 seasons, then sold it in 2012 because my lap times had increased. I missed the friendship and fun on the track, so I thought a sidecar would be fun to race.

The chassis was built, but not finished, by Bob Bakker for Larry Coleman near Sacramento, California. Jason and I analyzed what we needed and started developing the bike. One of the things we needed were 3"x16" wheels and sidecar road racing tires. After two months searching in the U.S., we ended up sending two Slash 6 hubs to Central Wheel Components in Birmingham, England, for spokes, rims, tires and tubes. That put the bike at the correct height. The 10” wheel needed a spindle and height block welded at the correct height and angle for sidecar's toe-in. Jason and Noll worked on the chassis and body development while I built the motor and transmission.

AHRMA rules require a 1972 appearance and 750 cc engine. I obtained a 1981 engine, with a flywheel carrier for lightness, and a 1979 five-speed transmission. The narrowed Slash 5 swing arm was on the car. I worked with Dan Baisley of Baisley High Performance to install and degree the sport cam, dual-plug the heads and raise the compression. As neither Jason nor I had driven a sidecar rig, we wanted a reliable rig for the first year as we learned what we were doing. Ozzie Auer from Chico, California, gave us some tips on the chassis and car setup, which we as novices, really needed.

Our first race was on July 13-14 at The Ridge in Shelton, Washington. The engine and chassis were ready, but we did not have the full fairing installed for the first race. In practice and the first race, we had a fuel delivery problem. We eventually replaced the fuel pump and the rig ran well on Sunday.

Sunday morning practice was fun with no problems, but it provided a good story for Jason. He works as a contractor and, at 41, had high cholesterol problem. About a year ago, he had a heart attack, which resulted in a defibrillator being installed. On Sunday, Jason’s defibrillator recorded a high heartbeat at 10:30 a.m., 10:33 a.m., 10:36 a.m. and 10:38 a.m. When Jason got home on Sunday around 10:00 p.m., the modem for the defibrillator downloaded to the hospital the recordings. At 8:30 a.m. on Monday, Jason got a call from his doctor’s office and the nurse was quite concerned about him. Jason explained about the racing, claiming it was better to apologize afterwards than ask the doctor permission and be denied. The nurse laughed and told him to come in on Wednesday for a defibrillator adjustment.

The race on Sunday was smooth with no new defibrillator events for Jason. We were the one vintage outfit in the race, so we got a 30-second head start over the four modern F2 outfits. Two outfits passed us and the other two stayed a few seconds behind us. We had lap times of 3:00, 2:58, 2:57 and 2:54. It felt good to finish third out of five the first time out.

We have several things to improve on the outfit: the handholds for Jason and shift linkage for my left foot. We had fun and were successful for the first time out. We were drifting and occasionally lifting the car on right corners, which made the spectators happy. The modern outfits made us feel welcome and were glad to have another outfit out on the track. Even though our knees ached and Jason’s arms were pumped up, we really enjoyed ourselves.

Our next race was the AHRMA 8th Bonneville Vintage GP road race held at Miller Motorsports Park in Tooele, Utah over Labor Day weekend. Jason, Noll, Vincent and Hans drove Jason’s motor home and trailer 12 hours east for the event. Ten to twelve sidecar outfits were at the SRA points event. The sidecar went through tech and was approved to run on the track for Friday practice. We got more practice time on the track at Miller than ever before.

Jason and I were getting more comfortable as a team and working together in synchronization. When we came in after each practice session, other sidecar passengers advised Jason on how to move out to the right and back to the left as we cornered. I started picking up speed as we cornered more aggressively. We were drifting and using more body English to move smoothly through corners, so our lap times dropped with each practice.

During Saturday morning practice the motor began to slow, so I pulled off the track and rode back to the pits. We pulled the right valve cover and saw a broken exhaust valve spring. We had 90 minutes until the race so we had to find a fix quickly. We knew that there were no shops that would have our parts; we asked around the pits and found out that Larry Coleman had a core engine for his new outfit in a bucket. I asked him if we could use the parts we needed and he lent us the right head, which we quickly installed. The borrowed head was not dual-plugged, so I secured the extra spark plug to the block. We made the starting grid by two minutes and had a good race. We were running second and slowly lowering our lap times each lap.


Vincent (left) and Hans Vaden.

We went through tech inspection again for the Sundays race, but we had ignition problems. I thought the problem was fixed, but on the warmup lap, the rig went on one cylinder again and we had to pull off the track.

We had a good race weekend and really appreciated the help from other fellow outfits to keep us going. Larry Campbell and his son, Larry, lent us tools and advice, Larry Coleman loaned us the spare head and Bob Baker provided setup tips.

From a raw chrome alloy chassis to a running competition outfit, it took a full team of people. We will remove the bugs for next season and will be back for more fun on the track!


At Miller.

Tags:  Airheads  Racing  Sidecar 

Permalink | Comments (0)
 
Membership Software Powered by YourMembership  ::  Legal