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Always Fuel for this Stove

Posted By Roger Zander, Saturday, December 3, 2016
So you want to use a stove while camping but, you don't want to carry an extra container of fuel.  The solution that I have used for many years motorcycle camping is the Coleman Dual Fuel 533 Sportster camp stove.  It is a single burner, very solid construction (made in USA) with high BTU output to boil water in about 4 minutes. The stoves runs on white gas (Coleman fuel) or on the gasoline in your motorcycle tank.  I always run premium in my K1600 and the stove always burns clean.  All you need is suitable siphon tubing, a quarter inch diameter, long enough to reach down into the tank. When you're finished and packing up, just pour the extra fuel back into the tank, if you wish. 

Tags:  camping  cooking  stove 

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Adjusting your Phone or GPS

Posted By Bruce Peacock, Sunday, June 7, 2015
Most of us have had the trouble of trying to adjust a phone or GPS with your gloves on. I found a quick and easy solution. First go to you local dollar store and pick up one of the small zip type card holders, the kind you use to hold you ID card when you go in and out of a building on a regular basis. They usually have a clip on the back. You might want to use it or remove it and use double sided tape to put it where you want on the bike. Next, get one of the small stylus that are about an inch long. Then fasten the stylus to the retractable ID holder unit line and pick your spot where you want to put it. Now when you want to change you GPS with you gloves on you can grab it and us it on you unit. Works great and only costs two dollars

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Tent stakes

Posted By Mike Williams, Monday, May 25, 2015

I use a pair of vice grips to pound in my tent stakes if needed instead of a hammer. The vice grip has a multitude of other uses compared to a hammer and they weigh less. ie.  Temp foot peg, gear shift, handle bar , camera mount, tooth puller (just kidding) clamping anything etc. The vice grips pull the stakes easily as well. 

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Timing the blinker just right

Posted By Dan Hubing, Wednesday, January 28, 2015
I have always felt comfortable when I see another vehicle using their blinkers a few seconds before they change lanes. So when I'm passing vehicles, I start with putting my blinker on first and then reset my hands on the handle bars. Only after my blinkers have been on and I've checked other traffic again, that I shift lanes. This gives other drivers a few seconds of notice, plus my arms and hands are in proper position for any emergency during the lane shift. Road surface changes vary quite a bit when changing lanes, so I'm always prepared.

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Please, Ride My Bike

Posted By Roger W. Wiles, Wednesday, January 28, 2015

ATGATT is good advice, and many conscientious riders also include hearing protection under that motto. But on occasion (perhaps when warming up the bike before or after an oil change), you should ride a few miles without them. It’s amazing how many mechanical issues can be ‘masked’ by good ear protection. Better to discover them close to home than while traveling.

And speaking of discovering maintenance issues, if you have a neighbor or family member that also rides, have him/her take your mount for a spin on occasion. Some flaws go undetected by acclimated owners, but might be readily apparent to someone else with some riding experience. Two heads better than one, you know.

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Cloth Shopping Bags are a Poor Man's Cooler

Posted By Matthew T. Benson, Wednesday, January 28, 2015
Many stores now offer (or sell at a modest cost) cloth shopping bags. Consider dedicating a couple to your bike inventory. With rectangular bottoms and strong handles, they work well as a tote for the campground/rally shower, bringing items back from a convenience store or serving as a ‘poor man’s cooler’ when loaded with ice and cold beverages.

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Lube a Zipper or Start a Fire

Posted By Scott Muetzelburg, Wednesday, January 28, 2015
Next time you’re getting ready to take a long motorcycle trip that involves camping, throw several tubes of ChapStick™ in the bike. It’s great for lubing stubborn zippers, and, along with a piece of paper, a cotton ball, or some other form of kindling, it also enhances your fire-starting chances. You can even use it as a candle by shoving a toothpick down the center. And of course, I guess you could always apply it to sun- and wind-burnt lips.

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If Momma Ain't Happy

Posted By Bob Morrow, Wednesday, January 28, 2015
When it comes to encouraging your significant other to ride along on longer motorcycle trips, embrace the pleasures of “indoor camping.” By that, I mean patronizing motels rather than campgrounds. Lighted parking (often under a canopy), cushy sleeping, restaurants nearby or pizza delivery, and enjoying an ‘adult beverage’ in the room while watching a recently-released movie can be a pleasant way to travel. When she knows you planned for her comfort and convenience, coming along will be at the top of her list, too!

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Lightweight Camping Stove

Posted By Bridwell Terhune, Wednesday, January 28, 2015
Under the mantra of KISS (“Keep It Super Simple”), a close friend who enjoys camping passed along his solution for the most compact, portable camping stove ever conceived. Remove the rubber bottom and center bolt from a metal kitchen sink strainer, then turn it upside down and place it over a can of Sterno. Now heat up your soup, beans, ravioli or coffee!

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A bit of wallet leather stops the chafe

Posted By Lance Morehead, Wednesday, January 28, 2015
For those of us who might not be partial to calf-length socks in warmer months, the “loops” of the hook and loop closures that keep the flaps of touring boots secure could end up chaffing against our bare shins. Such irritation is hardly appreciated, and I learned to avoid it by securing a piece of soft leather (perhaps from an old wallet?) to that slight area of the loop that would normally have touched my leg – abrasion problem solved!

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Liquid Soap Creates Antifog Faceshield

Posted By Al Holtsberry, Wednesday, January 28, 2015
If you find yourself drifting through patches of early morning fog, and your face shield is now blurring your field of vision, the application of an anti-fog chemical would come in handy – but only if you possess one or remembered to pack it. In a pinch, simply spread a thin coating of the liquid soap from the gas station restroom uniformly over the shield’s surface. Then gently wipe clean with a non-abrasive cloth. The resulting film, though transparent, will inhibit fogging for quite some time, and allow you to ride on without compromised sight.

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